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Is it difficult to be a team player? A question that is barely asked. We are always bombed with flocculus how much teamwork is important and how special it is. But we are never asked, is it difficult to be a part of the team? To fully believe the other person. To feel supported and not overwhelmed. To feel like you are ending each other sentences and encouraging creative storms just when it's needed.
If you ever felt like a stranger in a room, or like the only person that doesn't get the topic right - we invite you to read this blog. Let it soak, and try to find some answers to your struggles.
The powerful artistic duo behind Pottery&Poetry is a great inspiration for anyone looking for an example of team work. Maria Baleva creating pottery and Zornitsa Genova writing poetry. In every aspect of their work, you can feel them complementing each other. With grace, they blended two art directions into one brand. Making a creative and encouraging space for every person that decides to be a part of their journey.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

We are Bulgarians living and working in Sofia.  Art has been a part of our lives for as long as we can remember.  In one way or another, it has always been present around us

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

It's different every time.  Sometimes inspiration pulls you out of bed at night and you have no rest until you create something, and sometimes you need to meditate a little in the waters of your subconscious because the everyday life has caught you by the throat and you are just blocked.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

We really hope so, we would be happy for our things to resonate differently in our different fans, because that means that they bring a multi-layered energy and emotion.  We do not like to define the process, it is alive and should not be framed.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists? 

The most difficult thing is to find time to keep your true creative energy alive so that you do not lose your inner impulse and be true to yourself.  If you do things with desire and love, they always succeed. That is our advise, just don’t give up on what you really love to do.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Interesting question, we have not thought about it in that point of view. There is a creative energy and we follow it, the parts of it are inseparable from the whole and are equally important because they resonate with each other.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

The choice of materials is mainly purely practical, we prefer porcelain because it is durable, but there are items that give more defects with porcelain. The rest is a matter of inspiration and of course each costumer has different preferences. Every material carries a different energy and requires a different techniques so it is cool to switch them in order to keep yourself intrigued.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is a necessity, it cannot and should not be defined. Art is a way of living that helps you enjoy the beauty and wisdom that flows from everything, making you feel one with the soul of the world.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Maria Baleva and Zornitsa Genova for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Is it difficult to be a team player? A question that is barely asked. We are always bombed with flocculus how much teamwork is important and how special it is. But we are never asked, is it difficult to be a part of the team? To fully believe the other person. To feel supported and not overwhelmed. To feel like you are ending each other sentences and encouraging creative storms just when it's needed.
If you ever felt like a stranger in a room, or like the only person that doesn't get the topic right - we invite you to read this blog. Let it soak, and try to find some answers to your struggles.
The powerful artistic duo behind Pottery&Poetry is a great inspiration for anyone looking for an example of team work. Maria Baleva creating pottery and Zornitsa Genova writing poetry. In every aspect of their work, you can feel them complementing each other. With grace, they blended two art directions into one brand. Making a creative and encouraging space for every person that decides to be a part of their journey.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

We are Bulgarians living and working in Sofia.  Art has been a part of our lives for as long as we can remember.  In one way or another, it has always been present around us

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

It's different every time.  Sometimes inspiration pulls you out of bed at night and you have no rest until you create something, and sometimes you need to meditate a little in the waters of your subconscious because the everyday life has caught you by the throat and you are just blocked.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

We really hope so, we would be happy for our things to resonate differently in our different fans, because that means that they bring a multi-layered energy and emotion.  We do not like to define the process, it is alive and should not be framed.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists? 

The most difficult thing is to find time to keep your true creative energy alive so that you do not lose your inner impulse and be true to yourself.  If you do things with desire and love, they always succeed. That is our advise, just don’t give up on what you really love to do.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Interesting question, we have not thought about it in that point of view. There is a creative energy and we follow it, the parts of it are inseparable from the whole and are equally important because they resonate with each other.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

The choice of materials is mainly purely practical, we prefer porcelain because it is durable, but there are items that give more defects with porcelain. The rest is a matter of inspiration and of course each costumer has different preferences. Every material carries a different energy and requires a different techniques so it is cool to switch them in order to keep yourself intrigued.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is a necessity, it cannot and should not be defined. Art is a way of living that helps you enjoy the beauty and wisdom that flows from everything, making you feel one with the soul of the world.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Maria Baleva and Zornitsa Genova for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.
Life is about the journey, not the destination!
How many times have you heard it? For me, it's one of the phrases that keep on repeating endlessly, and no one is giving you the manual to live that way. To be present. To be here. With your full mind and body. I must admit I have tried to practice that life approach couple of times, but it always ends up with failure.
Being so fascinated by the present moment, and in constant search of the right recipe for my unsolved case, I came across one fascinating artist. Her story made me think in a different direction.
Bea was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis two years ago. In her search of solutions for life problems that hit us hard - she found art. She started developing her world of Tender Flesh, a pottery brand of exquisite pieces. And everything that Tender Flesh is now is part of who Bea was, and who she will become.
I guess we can agree with a strong point: Life is about the journey, and experiences and love, and sorrow. And everything that we listen, feel, or see. It is unique to us - it is tender like the flesh.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I’m from a small town in rural Wales, but I now live in Bath, England. I’ve always been interested in art, specifically 3D, and I’ve had a fascination with objects which appear alive as long as I can remember. From a young age I would sculpt prosthetics and SFX costumes, and spent a long time practicing realistic sculpture and body horror. A lot of my current work is inspired by horror sculpture, intersected with drag culture and fashion.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Many of my pieces come from a morbid curiosity with the human body and its limitations, though a lot of my work comes from a place of humor - in fact a lot of my ideas start as jokes with my partner.
I have lists of ideas for pieces that I’d like to make, and add to them whenever inspiration strikes. Usually as soon as I’ve had an idea I’ll know if it’ll work well and whether it’ll be effective – though sometimes the pieces I didn’t expect to work were the ones that came out the best! Sometimes though I just start sculpting and whatever comes out comes out, but usually I’ve planned out what I’ll be making ahead of time.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I began making art as a way to deal with my diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) two years ago. I felt betrayed by my body and I use my art as a way to explore the relationship I have with my fragile, tender flesh, and also as a way to create something I value when my MS means I can’t do my PhD.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

My main struggle is in dealing with the unexpected and constant nature of my MS. Some days I can work for hours and feel fine, but others I can’t get out of bed or feel my hands, and I often don’t know how a day will be until I wake up that morning. I am still grieving for my life before MS, but I’m finding joy in what I can do, and appreciating the new worlds my disability has opened up for me and the connections I’ve made along the way.

My advice to starting artists would be to not aim for perfection but progress, and to be gentle with themselves. Also, social media may be a nightmare, but it has opened up so many doors for me, and I encourage artists to use it as they feel comfortable but also not to dwell too much on numerical measures of success, which can be demotivating and can ruin the joy of creating.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Usually each item I make is stand-alone, though last year I collaborated with an amazing artist (Izzie Beirne) on a small run of pots which she painted in her unique style. I really enjoyed working on this collection of four complimentary pieces, and would like to do more collections based off a unifying theme in future.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use polymer clay for all of my pieces, because it’s a material I can sculpt, paint and bake at home. I began creating during the beginning of the pandemic, and since I was shielding I couldn’t go to a ceramics studio to use a kiln, so I opted for this more accessible material. It has its limitations, and I would love to make ceramics now that I feel a little safer going outside, though I’m aware it’s a very different material so it could take some getting used to!

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

For me, art is freedom, self-expression and beauty. It exists everywhere and enriches all our lives, whether we’re aware of it or not. I enjoy art which is honest, scary and thought-provoking, and my aim with my work is to create animate inanimate objects that I’d like to have in my own home but which frighten me a little.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Bea for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Life is about the journey, not the destination!
How many times have you heard it? For me, it's one of the phrases that keep on repeating endlessly, and no one is giving you the manual to live that way. To be present. To be here. With your full mind and body. I must admit I have tried to practice that life approach couple of times, but it always ends up with failure.
Being so fascinated by the present moment, and in constant search of the right recipe for my unsolved case, I came across one fascinating artist. Her story made me think in a different direction.
Bea was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis two years ago. In her search of solutions for life problems that hit us hard - she found art. She started developing her world of Tender Flesh, a pottery brand of exquisite pieces. And everything that Tender Flesh is now is part of who Bea was, and who she will become.
I guess we can agree with a strong point: Life is about the journey, and experiences and love, and sorrow. And everything that we listen, feel, or see. It is unique to us - it is tender like the flesh.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I’m from a small town in rural Wales, but I now live in Bath, England. I’ve always been interested in art, specifically 3D, and I’ve had a fascination with objects which appear alive as long as I can remember. From a young age I would sculpt prosthetics and SFX costumes, and spent a long time practicing realistic sculpture and body horror. A lot of my current work is inspired by horror sculpture, intersected with drag culture and fashion.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Many of my pieces come from a morbid curiosity with the human body and its limitations, though a lot of my work comes from a place of humor - in fact a lot of my ideas start as jokes with my partner.
I have lists of ideas for pieces that I’d like to make, and add to them whenever inspiration strikes. Usually as soon as I’ve had an idea I’ll know if it’ll work well and whether it’ll be effective – though sometimes the pieces I didn’t expect to work were the ones that came out the best! Sometimes though I just start sculpting and whatever comes out comes out, but usually I’ve planned out what I’ll be making ahead of time.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I began making art as a way to deal with my diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) two years ago. I felt betrayed by my body and I use my art as a way to explore the relationship I have with my fragile, tender flesh, and also as a way to create something I value when my MS means I can’t do my PhD.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

My main struggle is in dealing with the unexpected and constant nature of my MS. Some days I can work for hours and feel fine, but others I can’t get out of bed or feel my hands, and I often don’t know how a day will be until I wake up that morning. I am still grieving for my life before MS, but I’m finding joy in what I can do, and appreciating the new worlds my disability has opened up for me and the connections I’ve made along the way.

My advice to starting artists would be to not aim for perfection but progress, and to be gentle with themselves. Also, social media may be a nightmare, but it has opened up so many doors for me, and I encourage artists to use it as they feel comfortable but also not to dwell too much on numerical measures of success, which can be demotivating and can ruin the joy of creating.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Usually each item I make is stand-alone, though last year I collaborated with an amazing artist (Izzie Beirne) on a small run of pots which she painted in her unique style. I really enjoyed working on this collection of four complimentary pieces, and would like to do more collections based off a unifying theme in future.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use polymer clay for all of my pieces, because it’s a material I can sculpt, paint and bake at home. I began creating during the beginning of the pandemic, and since I was shielding I couldn’t go to a ceramics studio to use a kiln, so I opted for this more accessible material. It has its limitations, and I would love to make ceramics now that I feel a little safer going outside, though I’m aware it’s a very different material so it could take some getting used to!

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

For me, art is freedom, self-expression and beauty. It exists everywhere and enriches all our lives, whether we’re aware of it or not. I enjoy art which is honest, scary and thought-provoking, and my aim with my work is to create animate inanimate objects that I’d like to have in my own home but which frighten me a little.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Bea for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

The talent finds its way. It is built from the scratch. Slowly and strongly, like a mountain river, it paves its road and dives through your every cell. Even if there is a lack of tools, it will build the path.
Anastasia Trusova is the real example of that. Brought up in difficult conditions, her artistic spirit grew even stronger. Highly influenced by the environment she grew up in, she paints in a live and almost self telling way. It is a time machine, a transporter into a Russian snow fairytale where all the beauties and difficulties come to life. Her paintings take you to a different world, they are a rest to the tired eye and beauty to the home.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I was born in a small town in the Ivanovo region in Russia.  In my city there were 2 schools after school: sewing - technical and art.  Therefore, everyone in our town wanted to become either a seamstress or an artist.  I've been painting for as long as I can remember.  At first there were art studios and circles, then art schools and the university.  We lived very poorly, poorly, so my mother bought 2 sweets from sweets in the store, 1 for me, 1 for my sister.  It's poor when you eat pasta with sugar and sunflower oil, and they buy clothes for you to grow, 2-3 sizes larger.  Therefore, my first artistic tool was a simple slate pencil and watercolor.  However, around our town there were forests and swamps, forests that stretched for thousands of kilometers, with a rich flora and fauna.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I've always done well.  Our family was in the mood for higher education.  And I wanted to be the best myself.  I have always remembered the phrase: "the main thing is to prioritize."  For me, the most important thing is my family: children, husband, parents and sister's family.  I devote almost all my time to my family and draw inspiration from my day with them.  It can be a beautiful shadow from a baby carriage on the cracked asphalt, or spray from under the wheels of the elder son's bicycle.  I don't think about the plot in advance.  I paint a place from several photos at once and think out in the process.  It's great!  We artists can at least grow grass in a cloud on our canvas)

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I have already said that my first instrument is pencil and paints, but besides that, I studied sculpture for another 10 years.  When I started painting again, after a long pause, it was difficult for me to exclude something.  I can't paint now with oil, so I started with acrylic.  In truth, I have never painted with acrylic, my first experience was only in 2017.  The only thing that upset me was that it darkens, fades and becomes flat.  Fortunately, there are now various additives that allow him to maintain volume.  It was they who allowed me to sculpt volume in the picture and create my own style: texture graphic impressionism.  What to call backstory?  I studied in physics and mathematics class, and after class I went to art school ... classes were there until 20-22 pm, and then bus-metro-bus home.  I finished the last class as an external student, as I had to work to pay for tutors for admission to the institute and my Art materials.  Then I graduated with honors from the university and worked as a shoe designer for 3 years.  After I moved to my husband in Belgium, and only after birth and unsuccessful job searches in my specialty, I began to paint again.  In Belgium, I was offered a job as a shop assistant, or as a cleaner.  Since the country does not need footwear designers ... all I want to show in my paintings is the beauty of nature, the noise of the forest, the warmth of the first ray, the laughter of children.  Of course, not all my paintings will resonate in the heart, we are all different and this is normal!

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

As an aspiring artist, I would advise you not to compare yourself with other artists, but only with yourself a year or more ago.  Don't expect quick sales!  The artist first works for the name, and then the name works for the artist.  Throw away the boundaries that get in the way of creativity and be yourself.  There are billions of people on earth, and if 10,000 tell you what is not beautiful, trust me 10001 will say that he fell in love with your work, you just need to meet this person.  And of course, in order to start making money through art, you need to work, work and work.  As my husband said, being an artist is the most unprofitable profession, you invest time, money, energy all your life, and you start selling only after many years...

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer not to tell stories for my paintings.  Paintings are a luxury item, I do not want to impose on anyone the purchase of a painting.  The buyer must see and feel his own personal experience.  It shouldn't be a rash purchase that he will later regret.  My paintings have stories, but only I know about them.  The buyer will buy and give them his.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I love to experiment.  I am bored to paint the same way.  Therefore, acrylic is perfect.  Almost anything is possible.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is freedom, it is a tool for conveying emotions and feelings to the viewer.  I want my viewers to have only positive emotions and I hope that you will have only them.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Anastasia Trusova for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.
The talent finds its way. It is built from the scratch. Slowly and strongly, like a mountain river, it paves its road and dives through your every cell. Even if there is a lack of tools, it will build the path.
Anastasia Trusova is the real example of that. Brought up in difficult conditions, her artistic spirit grew even stronger. Highly influenced by the environment she grew up in, she paints in a live and almost self telling way. It is a time machine, a transporter into a Russian snow fairytale where all the beauties and difficulties come to life. Her paintings take you to a different world, they are a rest to the tired eye and beauty to the home.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I was born in a small town in the Ivanovo region in Russia.  In my city there were 2 schools after school: sewing - technical and art.  Therefore, everyone in our town wanted to become either a seamstress or an artist.  I've been painting for as long as I can remember.  At first there were art studios and circles, then art schools and the university.  We lived very poorly, poorly, so my mother bought 2 sweets from sweets in the store, 1 for me, 1 for my sister.  It's poor when you eat pasta with sugar and sunflower oil, and they buy clothes for you to grow, 2-3 sizes larger.  Therefore, my first artistic tool was a simple slate pencil and watercolor.  However, around our town there were forests and swamps, forests that stretched for thousands of kilometers, with a rich flora and fauna.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I've always done well.  Our family was in the mood for higher education.  And I wanted to be the best myself.  I have always remembered the phrase: "the main thing is to prioritize."  For me, the most important thing is my family: children, husband, parents and sister's family.  I devote almost all my time to my family and draw inspiration from my day with them.  It can be a beautiful shadow from a baby carriage on the cracked asphalt, or spray from under the wheels of the elder son's bicycle.  I don't think about the plot in advance.  I paint a place from several photos at once and think out in the process.  It's great!  We artists can at least grow grass in a cloud on our canvas)

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I have already said that my first instrument is pencil and paints, but besides that, I studied sculpture for another 10 years.  When I started painting again, after a long pause, it was difficult for me to exclude something.  I can't paint now with oil, so I started with acrylic.  In truth, I have never painted with acrylic, my first experience was only in 2017.  The only thing that upset me was that it darkens, fades and becomes flat.  Fortunately, there are now various additives that allow him to maintain volume.  It was they who allowed me to sculpt volume in the picture and create my own style: texture graphic impressionism.  What to call backstory?  I studied in physics and mathematics class, and after class I went to art school ... classes were there until 20-22 pm, and then bus-metro-bus home.  I finished the last class as an external student, as I had to work to pay for tutors for admission to the institute and my Art materials.  Then I graduated with honors from the university and worked as a shoe designer for 3 years.  After I moved to my husband in Belgium, and only after birth and unsuccessful job searches in my specialty, I began to paint again.  In Belgium, I was offered a job as a shop assistant, or as a cleaner.  Since the country does not need footwear designers ... all I want to show in my paintings is the beauty of nature, the noise of the forest, the warmth of the first ray, the laughter of children.  Of course, not all my paintings will resonate in the heart, we are all different and this is normal!

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

As an aspiring artist, I would advise you not to compare yourself with other artists, but only with yourself a year or more ago.  Don't expect quick sales!  The artist first works for the name, and then the name works for the artist.  Throw away the boundaries that get in the way of creativity and be yourself.  There are billions of people on earth, and if 10,000 tell you what is not beautiful, trust me 10001 will say that he fell in love with your work, you just need to meet this person.  And of course, in order to start making money through art, you need to work, work and work.  As my husband said, being an artist is the most unprofitable profession, you invest time, money, energy all your life, and you start selling only after many years...

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer not to tell stories for my paintings.  Paintings are a luxury item, I do not want to impose on anyone the purchase of a painting.  The buyer must see and feel his own personal experience.  It shouldn't be a rash purchase that he will later regret.  My paintings have stories, but only I know about them.  The buyer will buy and give them his.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I love to experiment.  I am bored to paint the same way.  Therefore, acrylic is perfect.  Almost anything is possible.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is freedom, it is a tool for conveying emotions and feelings to the viewer.  I want my viewers to have only positive emotions and I hope that you will have only them.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Anastasia Trusova for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

When we first encountered Lois art we thought she is doing sketches from new-age Disney movies. All those details and the strong personality of her designs must be from a serious department full of very talented artists, working for a huge company. But, my oh my, we were so wrong.
The talented artist from The Netherlands spent most of her life working on her craft. She is a digital artist, without the limits for her imagination. Her designs move the most delicate feelings inside your soul and wake up your inner child. With a serious response to major social issues she is speaking her truth, the best way she can - through art powered with a creative spark.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I'm from the Netherlands but lived in different countries throughout my childhood! I've been drawing my whole life, so I can't remember a specific moment where I started drawing. It's just always been one of my favorite things to do!

  
What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I usually create a piece based on a 'creative spark' - a small moment in which I feel an urge to create. If I'm drawing at that moment, I will jump on this spark and use it to fuel my creative process. If I'm not drawing, I will write down a few words, take a photo, or create some kind of reminder of what is inspiring me, so I can use it later.


What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I try to stick to my own style and creative vision when I draw, and enjoy the process. Because of this approach, I think the work I create is a good reflection of how I see the world and the mood I am in when I'm creating. I'm always happy when other people can get a sense of this vision through my art, but it's not a requirement for me to create. 


When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

I think it's very difficult to juggle the less fun tasks - e-mail, invoices, keeping track of my hours, etc - with the creative stuff. I definitely recommend for artists to do research into the business side of being an artist. It's not as fun, but if you can figure out a good way to do it, then it makes the whole process easier. 


What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I like to draw single pieces, because I feel less pressure from the overall project. I like to draw in short sessions and then quickly move on to the next thing. I usually do shorter sketch sessions and then from time to time I'll work on a bigger painting that takes a few days.


Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use digital media, because it gives me a large amount of flexibility. I can go back to previous steps, or make changes at any point in the process. This flexibility allows me to feel more carefree when I draw. 


What does ART, in general, mean to you?

For me personally, it means being able to make a living from self-expression, and having freedom. That's incredibly important to me! 
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Lois van Baarle for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

When we first encountered Lois art we thought she is doing sketches from new-age Disney movies. All those details and the strong personality of her designs must be from a serious department full of very talented artists, working for a huge company. But, my oh my, we were so wrong.
The talented artist from The Netherlands spent most of her life working on her craft. She is a digital artist, without the limits for her imagination. Her designs move the most delicate feelings inside your soul and wake up your inner child. With a serious response to major social issues she is speaking her truth, the best way she can - through art powered with a creative spark.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I'm from the Netherlands but lived in different countries throughout my childhood! I've been drawing my whole life, so I can't remember a specific moment where I started drawing. It's just always been one of my favorite things to do!

  
What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I usually create a piece based on a 'creative spark' - a small moment in which I feel an urge to create. If I'm drawing at that moment, I will jump on this spark and use it to fuel my creative process. If I'm not drawing, I will write down a few words, take a photo, or create some kind of reminder of what is inspiring me, so I can use it later.


What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I try to stick to my own style and creative vision when I draw, and enjoy the process. Because of this approach, I think the work I create is a good reflection of how I see the world and the mood I am in when I'm creating. I'm always happy when other people can get a sense of this vision through my art, but it's not a requirement for me to create. 


When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

I think it's very difficult to juggle the less fun tasks - e-mail, invoices, keeping track of my hours, etc - with the creative stuff. I definitely recommend for artists to do research into the business side of being an artist. It's not as fun, but if you can figure out a good way to do it, then it makes the whole process easier. 


What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I like to draw single pieces, because I feel less pressure from the overall project. I like to draw in short sessions and then quickly move on to the next thing. I usually do shorter sketch sessions and then from time to time I'll work on a bigger painting that takes a few days.


Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use digital media, because it gives me a large amount of flexibility. I can go back to previous steps, or make changes at any point in the process. This flexibility allows me to feel more carefree when I draw. 


What does ART, in general, mean to you?

For me personally, it means being able to make a living from self-expression, and having freedom. That's incredibly important to me! 
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Lois van Baarle for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

The complexity of human beings and all of their emotional states has always been a lesson to learn from. And the artistic approach that explores the world around us is a neverending process that keeps on rewarding. Giving us "live" examples, and showing us various emotional states. But how to keep it in one place, how to take those lessons to the future? How to prepare the young and give them the wisdom they are promised?
The artistic duo Coderch-Malavia is solving that mystery. Their dedication and love for their craft, have brought to life one of the most beautiful sculptures of modern time. While looking at them we can feel "the moment", we can develop empathy for the emotional states of their sculptures... And you will realize slowly, we can fall in love with their art.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

Joan Coderch:
I was born in Castellar del Vallés (Barcelona) Spain in 1959 and have studied at the Department of Fine Arts of Barcelona.
When I was very young I was lucky enough to find a teacher of Plastic Arts who saw in me the love and sensitivity I had for volume. He supported me and helped me by teaching me the basics of modeling. He took me to the house of Manuel Hugué, a famous Catalonian sculptor of the early twentieth century. This was for me a turning point. I discovered a whole new world andI realized sculpture, and Art in general, is the perfect way to express my ideas and my feelings.
Javier Malavia:
I was born in Oñati, a small town in the Basque Country of Spain, in 1970. When I was a little child I moved to Valencia with my family, there I graduated from the Department of Fine Arts of San Carlos.
I've always liked to draw and I've always loved nature, the human body, chemistry and physiology. Before I started my university studies I did not really know very well whether I wanted to follow one way or another.
Suddenly something clicked in my mind, just like when inspiration comes to you, and I realized that I wanted to study fine arts.
Once in class, the first contact I had with sculpture, especially the modeling, was like a crush. . . it was love at first sight.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Sharing the creation of a work of art is complicated, there must be a predisposition to fit together artistically.
The fact that a work of art can emerge from the collaboration of two different sensibilities might catch people's attention because it might seem complicated, but in reality we believe that this alliance empowers the finalresult. However, starting a project from a dual dynamic requires much more previous work. We start from several brainstorming sessions in which we put all the cards down on the table. During this process we share our ideas, no matter if they are good or bad, to get to a point where we understand what is important to us and what is that we want to develop.
Meeting and discussing is simple, the complicated part is organizing and sharing the physical creation of the work itself, because you need double discipline, you must learn to trust your partner and be able to share your ideas and your work with him, and, above all, you must put your ego aside in order to stay equal to commit to the final result.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

Literature, poetry, theater, photography, cinema and ballet, they all serve as inspiration.
We are always working from alive models. From the first sketches on paper, to the final pieces, teamwork is essential; Since the first modeling in clay to the final bronze´s patina, we control the whole process of our pieces. Everything is relevant, because in the final piece the emotions experienced during the creative process are condensed.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

We shouldn't talk about what our struggles have been, we should, instead, talk about what our daily struggle is, which is our obsession to transmit the best of ourselves through our work. We try to achieve excellence in what we do, so we are also very demanding with the people who work with us.
Then we want to advice starting artist to put passion, as much as possible on the thing they do.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

We are open to all possibilities, but until today we have focused more on unique pieces that represent intense moments in the lives that they count, on the myths that they evoke, but all of them remain suspended in an obvious enigma. This uncertainty is part of the mystery, the very center of the aesthetic circumstance of these works.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

We model in clay or wax, but our pieces end up being cast in bronze with the will of eternity. Each of the pieces is designed to last over time.
We model the human body in a classic way in figures always full of tension and movement, making matter speak in an elegiac way, sometimes bucolic, sometimes lyrical, but always with a high degree of poetry; always trying to place them near the limits of beauty.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is one of the great pillars of human expression. Seduction and fantasy arise from their masses and use matter as an object of thought. We do it with arguments typical of your discipline. Just as painting expresses itself with color, dances with the movement of the body and light, sculpture uses proportion, shadow, balances and textures of matter to move the sensitive viewer.
As we already know, Culture is an inexhaustible source on which the great edifice of knowledge is built piece by piece. We try to be two more actors in this beautiful human process that is Culture.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Joan Coderch and Javier Malavia for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

The complexity of human beings and all of their emotional states has always been a lesson to learn from. And the artistic approach that explores the world around us is a neverending process that keeps on rewarding. Giving us "live" examples, and showing us various emotional states. But how to keep it in one place, how to take those lessons to the future? How to prepare the young and give them the wisdom they are promised?
The artistic duo Coderch-Malavia is solving that mystery. Their dedication and love for their craft, have brought to life one of the most beautiful sculptures of modern time. While looking at them we can feel "the moment", we can develop empathy for the emotional states of their sculptures... And you will realize slowly, we can fall in love with their art.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

Joan Coderch:
I was born in Castellar del Vallés (Barcelona) Spain in 1959 and have studied at the Department of Fine Arts of Barcelona.
When I was very young I was lucky enough to find a teacher of Plastic Arts who saw in me the love and sensitivity I had for volume. He supported me and helped me by teaching me the basics of modeling. He took me to the house of Manuel Hugué, a famous Catalonian sculptor of the early twentieth century. This was for me a turning point. I discovered a whole new world andI realized sculpture, and Art in general, is the perfect way to express my ideas and my feelings.
Javier Malavia:
I was born in Oñati, a small town in the Basque Country of Spain, in 1970. When I was a little child I moved to Valencia with my family, there I graduated from the Department of Fine Arts of San Carlos.
I've always liked to draw and I've always loved nature, the human body, chemistry and physiology. Before I started my university studies I did not really know very well whether I wanted to follow one way or another.
Suddenly something clicked in my mind, just like when inspiration comes to you, and I realized that I wanted to study fine arts.
Once in class, the first contact I had with sculpture, especially the modeling, was like a crush. . . it was love at first sight.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Sharing the creation of a work of art is complicated, there must be a predisposition to fit together artistically.
The fact that a work of art can emerge from the collaboration of two different sensibilities might catch people's attention because it might seem complicated, but in reality we believe that this alliance empowers the finalresult. However, starting a project from a dual dynamic requires much more previous work. We start from several brainstorming sessions in which we put all the cards down on the table. During this process we share our ideas, no matter if they are good or bad, to get to a point where we understand what is important to us and what is that we want to develop.
Meeting and discussing is simple, the complicated part is organizing and sharing the physical creation of the work itself, because you need double discipline, you must learn to trust your partner and be able to share your ideas and your work with him, and, above all, you must put your ego aside in order to stay equal to commit to the final result.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

Literature, poetry, theater, photography, cinema and ballet, they all serve as inspiration.
We are always working from alive models. From the first sketches on paper, to the final pieces, teamwork is essential; Since the first modeling in clay to the final bronze´s patina, we control the whole process of our pieces. Everything is relevant, because in the final piece the emotions experienced during the creative process are condensed.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

We shouldn't talk about what our struggles have been, we should, instead, talk about what our daily struggle is, which is our obsession to transmit the best of ourselves through our work. We try to achieve excellence in what we do, so we are also very demanding with the people who work with us.
Then we want to advice starting artist to put passion, as much as possible on the thing they do.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

We are open to all possibilities, but until today we have focused more on unique pieces that represent intense moments in the lives that they count, on the myths that they evoke, but all of them remain suspended in an obvious enigma. This uncertainty is part of the mystery, the very center of the aesthetic circumstance of these works.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

We model in clay or wax, but our pieces end up being cast in bronze with the will of eternity. Each of the pieces is designed to last over time.
We model the human body in a classic way in figures always full of tension and movement, making matter speak in an elegiac way, sometimes bucolic, sometimes lyrical, but always with a high degree of poetry; always trying to place them near the limits of beauty.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is one of the great pillars of human expression. Seduction and fantasy arise from their masses and use matter as an object of thought. We do it with arguments typical of your discipline. Just as painting expresses itself with color, dances with the movement of the body and light, sculpture uses proportion, shadow, balances and textures of matter to move the sensitive viewer.
As we already know, Culture is an inexhaustible source on which the great edifice of knowledge is built piece by piece. We try to be two more actors in this beautiful human process that is Culture.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Joan Coderch and Javier Malavia for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

I once heard that the most classic works of art require the most time and dedication. The path is already there. But path covered in the greatness that comes even from ancient time. How do we walk that path with confidence? What goes into creating a Classique masterpiece? And how does an artist reinvent himself?
All of these questions came to my mind when I encountered the work of José Manuel Martínez Pérez. If you are new in the art world his pieces will send you back to history classes in school. But is it really like that?
His art carries a deep emotion of the modern world. If you stare a couple of seconds into his work you will find yourself in conversation with the piece. And is there a more satisfying feeling?

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I was born in Lepe, a bright town on the coast of Huelva in Andalusia. I started very young, in adolescence, copying drawing pictures and curiously observing my surroundings, everything seemed to me a reason to tell something.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

The truth is, I don't think too much when I work. Intuition is very present in the seed of my work, I think that the visceral guides me, it is an impulse, a need. The creative process is changing and in my case it evolves with the work, I doubt and modify the original idea a lot until the piece tells me that it is on the way, then I start to close and think about the final result.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

The human in its broadest sense. Life, the feminine, the masculine, constant duality, life, death, old age, the beginning, the end, ultimately human passions. Sometimes I use my work as a catharsis of my own life, healthy with my sculptures. People who look at a sculpture complete the work and in the creative process, the viewer's gaze is essential, it gives meaning to the work of any artist. I do not like to explain what I do, I find the reading that others do fascinating, I do not like to close the speech with my opinion.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

Constancy, passion and the trade. It is very important to work every day and look at every moment for motivation and surprise or novelty. To a beginning artist I would say: live, experiment, carefully observe your surroundings and nature, but above all, always work sincerely without expecting easy applause from others.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Sometimes I make individual pieces and sometimes I make series with a specific theme. The advantage of the series is that you delve into a topic and the work evolves, but I avoid lengthening the series a lot so as not to repeat myself.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use many final materials, bronze, wood, resins, etc. I always model with clay, a humble material that comes out of the earth and water, it seems to me a perfect and changing medium for my work, it allows me to get to what I want.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

It is the main motivation of my life, I dedicate a large part of my day to day to give shape to new ideas. For me it is a job, a joy and above all a privilege that I appreciate every morning. Art is essential for happiness and for connection or communication with others.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank José Manuel Martínez Pérez for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

I once heard that the most classic works of art require the most time and dedication. The path is already there. But path covered in the greatness that comes even from ancient time. How do we walk that path with confidence? What goes into creating a Classique masterpiece? And how does an artist reinvent himself?
All of these questions came to my mind when I encountered the work of José Manuel Martínez Pérez. If you are new in the art world his pieces will send you back to history classes in school. But is it really like that?
His art carries a deep emotion of the modern world. If you stare a couple of seconds into his work you will find yourself in conversation with the piece. And is there a more satisfying feeling?

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I was born in Lepe, a bright town on the coast of Huelva in Andalusia. I started very young, in adolescence, copying drawing pictures and curiously observing my surroundings, everything seemed to me a reason to tell something.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

The truth is, I don't think too much when I work. Intuition is very present in the seed of my work, I think that the visceral guides me, it is an impulse, a need. The creative process is changing and in my case it evolves with the work, I doubt and modify the original idea a lot until the piece tells me that it is on the way, then I start to close and think about the final result.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

The human in its broadest sense. Life, the feminine, the masculine, constant duality, life, death, old age, the beginning, the end, ultimately human passions. Sometimes I use my work as a catharsis of my own life, healthy with my sculptures. People who look at a sculpture complete the work and in the creative process, the viewer's gaze is essential, it gives meaning to the work of any artist. I do not like to explain what I do, I find the reading that others do fascinating, I do not like to close the speech with my opinion.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

Constancy, passion and the trade. It is very important to work every day and look at every moment for motivation and surprise or novelty. To a beginning artist I would say: live, experiment, carefully observe your surroundings and nature, but above all, always work sincerely without expecting easy applause from others.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Sometimes I make individual pieces and sometimes I make series with a specific theme. The advantage of the series is that you delve into a topic and the work evolves, but I avoid lengthening the series a lot so as not to repeat myself.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use many final materials, bronze, wood, resins, etc. I always model with clay, a humble material that comes out of the earth and water, it seems to me a perfect and changing medium for my work, it allows me to get to what I want.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

It is the main motivation of my life, I dedicate a large part of my day to day to give shape to new ideas. For me it is a job, a joy and above all a privilege that I appreciate every morning. Art is essential for happiness and for connection or communication with others.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank José Manuel Martínez Pérez for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Madison Polidoro is an artist originally from Glassboro, New Jersey. Her intriguing work brings a lot of opinions. It also brought her amazing and highly invested fan base. People who are following her every step and always craving for more. 
Madison Polidoro is an artist originally from Glassboro, New Jersey. Her intriguing work brings a lot of opinions. It also brought her amazing and highly invested fan base. People who are following her every step and always craving for more. 

If you take a look across your room, what can you notice about the decoration? In the majority of homes, we encounter commercialized, regular items. Although they might come from your favorite thrift store or Ikea, one thing is for sure - they are welcomed by the masses.
And as easy as it might be to neglect the effort of your amazing thrift store owner or designers in Ikea, we need to go to the stream of their work.
How they develop their design? Where do they start? Where does the inspiration come from? Surprisingly or not, most of them have deep knowledge of the History of Art and design itself. One of their major advice is to visit the museums. Go through the old photos, search for young inspiring people. In the journey of "developing the skill", we encounter Anouk Pantovola. A girl with a wild imagination and great skills that bring her thoughts to life.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?


I originally hail from The Netherlands, but I have lived in London, Scotland and Spain for most of my adult years
My art journey began from the day I could hold a pencil in my hands. I began to draw and paint and never stopped.
As a child I made cloth dolls with my mother at home and I have very fond memories of that.
We would use an old sock for example which we filled with cotton and dried lavender, and decorated it like primitive small dolls.


Later on we used paper mache for doll making.
I always knew I wanted to be an artist and never had any other career ideas, except for a little while when I wanted to be an archeologist..
I studied Fine Arts in Arnhem where I learned about puppet stop-motion animation. This rekindled my love for puppets and miniature worlds.
But Pantovola was born some ten years after graduating art school, in 2015, when I lived on a narrow canal boat in London and I did not have much space for art making. I remembered the small cloth dolls I made at home with my mother for which not much else was needed than some fabrics, needle and thread. The first Pantovola dolls were born there, and it was the beginning of this journey.


What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?


Stories are always developing in my head, at all times, and my work directly derives from these stories.
But the story can be seen as a whole, a world or kind of universe, where all these ideas and creatures meet and live, they are all connected somehow.
When I create, I do not plan ahead too much, I let the work create itself, I let it use my hands and yes, in that sense I go with the flow.
But the heart and soul of everything I make has its roots in these worlds I have been creating in my mind since I can remember.


What is the backstory of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?


I believe that there are things we all, as humans, recognize, some kind of archetypes that we have a deep understanding of. I have always had a great love and fascination for fairytales and folklore, and a lot of the themes, objects and subjects in these tales are, I believe, universally understood. We all understand at some level what they mean and what they are telling us.
I hope that my work has a similar effect in the sense that I do not wish to explain too much, but I hope that the work speaks for itself.
Perhaps it says different things to different people, that is okay, as long as it speaks of something and that a glimpse of the Pantovola world can be discovered through the eyes of the dolls.


When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?


For me the main struggle is money itself, I don't like money, but we all need it to live.
To connect something so magical to me as my work to something so mundane and sinister as money, is the difficult bit. However, it is a truth of the world and there is just no escaping from that. So I see it as wearing different 'hats' for different occasions. When it comes to selling my work, I have to be practical and I put my 'real world hat' on.


But when I create, I leave that hat somewhere far out of sight in the shadows.
My advice for starting artists would be to always look within, to what is unique about you. And to not let social media and all the images that are thrown your way distract you from what YOUR unique vision is. To try not to compare yourself to others too much. There is only one you who can create what you create, and that should be your focus, in my opinion.

And keep at it even though everyone around you may be telling you that your dreams of being an artist are silly. They are not silly, they are magical, and also achievable.
I very much like reading about the lives of artists from the past, and it mesmerizes me to find out about all their struggles and tribulations. Yet despite all these horrid things these people endured, they managed to leave a legacy of beautiful works of art.
This not only helps me put my own struggles into perspective, it also gives me hope that beauty is the thing that prevails in the end.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?


I like to work on bigger projects sometimes because there is a great focus within that. But I am often also a little impatient and I like to see results quickly, so this is what I love about making my Pantovola Petit figurines;
they come to life from idea to finished doll in a fairly short amount of time, and that can be really satisfying.
But as I mentioned earlier, the larger story is always at the root of everything I make, so not one piece really stands alone, if that makes sense.



Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?


My favorite materials are old textiles, with worn threads and perhaps a coffee stain spill that escaped a dainty porcelain cup in 1892.
So I collect and am sometimes gifted, antique textiles and lace.
The history in the threads, the secrets, the stories, the hands that held these fibers, is what makes working with these materials so special to me,
It feels like a connection to a larger story.
But I also absolutely love painting on fabric, and for these purposes I use unbleached cotton which I firmly stuff with recycled cotton fluff filling, to create the doll or sculpture.
This then makes for a great surface to paint my creature's faces on, and adorn them with what I like to call '3-D paintings"


What does ART, in general, mean to you?


Art is life. It is the blood that makes us human because in it we reflect who we are and how we perceive the world around us.
Art gives meaning to our lives. I believe it is as vital as food, water, and oxygen.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Anouk Pantovola for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

If you take a look across your room, what can you notice about the decoration? In the majority of homes, we encounter commercialized, regular items. Although they might come from your favorite thrift store or Ikea, one thing is for sure - they are welcomed by the masses.
And as easy as it might be to neglect the effort of your amazing thrift store owner or designers in Ikea, we need to go to the stream of their work.
How they develop their design? Where do they start? Where does the inspiration come from? Surprisingly or not, most of them have deep knowledge of the History of Art and design itself. One of their major advice is to visit the museums. Go through the old photos, search for young inspiring people. In the journey of "developing the skill", we encounter Anouk Pantovola. A girl with a wild imagination and great skills that bring her thoughts to life.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?


I originally hail from The Netherlands, but I have lived in London, Scotland and Spain for most of my adult years
My art journey began from the day I could hold a pencil in my hands. I began to draw and paint and never stopped.
As a child I made cloth dolls with my mother at home and I have very fond memories of that.
We would use an old sock for example which we filled with cotton and dried lavender, and decorated it like primitive small dolls.


Later on we used paper mache for doll making.
I always knew I wanted to be an artist and never had any other career ideas, except for a little while when I wanted to be an archeologist..
I studied Fine Arts in Arnhem where I learned about puppet stop-motion animation. This rekindled my love for puppets and miniature worlds.
But Pantovola was born some ten years after graduating art school, in 2015, when I lived on a narrow canal boat in London and I did not have much space for art making. I remembered the small cloth dolls I made at home with my mother for which not much else was needed than some fabrics, needle and thread. The first Pantovola dolls were born there, and it was the beginning of this journey.


What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?


Stories are always developing in my head, at all times, and my work directly derives from these stories.
But the story can be seen as a whole, a world or kind of universe, where all these ideas and creatures meet and live, they are all connected somehow.
When I create, I do not plan ahead too much, I let the work create itself, I let it use my hands and yes, in that sense I go with the flow.
But the heart and soul of everything I make has its roots in these worlds I have been creating in my mind since I can remember.


What is the backstory of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?


I believe that there are things we all, as humans, recognize, some kind of archetypes that we have a deep understanding of. I have always had a great love and fascination for fairytales and folklore, and a lot of the themes, objects and subjects in these tales are, I believe, universally understood. We all understand at some level what they mean and what they are telling us.
I hope that my work has a similar effect in the sense that I do not wish to explain too much, but I hope that the work speaks for itself.
Perhaps it says different things to different people, that is okay, as long as it speaks of something and that a glimpse of the Pantovola world can be discovered through the eyes of the dolls.


When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?


For me the main struggle is money itself, I don't like money, but we all need it to live.
To connect something so magical to me as my work to something so mundane and sinister as money, is the difficult bit. However, it is a truth of the world and there is just no escaping from that. So I see it as wearing different 'hats' for different occasions. When it comes to selling my work, I have to be practical and I put my 'real world hat' on.


But when I create, I leave that hat somewhere far out of sight in the shadows.
My advice for starting artists would be to always look within, to what is unique about you. And to not let social media and all the images that are thrown your way distract you from what YOUR unique vision is. To try not to compare yourself to others too much. There is only one you who can create what you create, and that should be your focus, in my opinion.

And keep at it even though everyone around you may be telling you that your dreams of being an artist are silly. They are not silly, they are magical, and also achievable.
I very much like reading about the lives of artists from the past, and it mesmerizes me to find out about all their struggles and tribulations. Yet despite all these horrid things these people endured, they managed to leave a legacy of beautiful works of art.
This not only helps me put my own struggles into perspective, it also gives me hope that beauty is the thing that prevails in the end.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?


I like to work on bigger projects sometimes because there is a great focus within that. But I am often also a little impatient and I like to see results quickly, so this is what I love about making my Pantovola Petit figurines;
they come to life from idea to finished doll in a fairly short amount of time, and that can be really satisfying.
But as I mentioned earlier, the larger story is always at the root of everything I make, so not one piece really stands alone, if that makes sense.



Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?


My favorite materials are old textiles, with worn threads and perhaps a coffee stain spill that escaped a dainty porcelain cup in 1892.
So I collect and am sometimes gifted, antique textiles and lace.
The history in the threads, the secrets, the stories, the hands that held these fibers, is what makes working with these materials so special to me,
It feels like a connection to a larger story.
But I also absolutely love painting on fabric, and for these purposes I use unbleached cotton which I firmly stuff with recycled cotton fluff filling, to create the doll or sculpture.
This then makes for a great surface to paint my creature's faces on, and adorn them with what I like to call '3-D paintings"


What does ART, in general, mean to you?


Art is life. It is the blood that makes us human because in it we reflect who we are and how we perceive the world around us.
Art gives meaning to our lives. I believe it is as vital as food, water, and oxygen.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Anouk Pantovola for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Evie Chang is California based artist, who is well know for her sculptures.
Evie Chang is California based artist, who is well know for her sculptures.
Tomás Barceló Castelá, is a Spanish artist, who is half French from Montauban and half Spanish from Mallorca. He studied studied Fine Arts, specializing in Sculpture, at the Sant Jordi Faculty of the University of Barcelona, where he learned from J.S. Jassans
Tomás Barceló Castelá, is a Spanish artist, who is half French from Montauban and half Spanish from Mallorca. He studied studied Fine Arts, specializing in Sculpture, at the Sant Jordi Faculty of the University of Barcelona, where he learned from J.S. Jassans