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Waiting for inspiration can be a difficult time. It cannot be forced or taken when you want to. It needs to be nurtured, developed, and fed. Paths to inspiration are different and unique for each one of us. But it is always helpful to hear someone else experience and try to find a similar spark within yourself. The duo behind the Mishelino Studio found their inspiration in the ancient technique of paper-mâché while searching through old family Christmas ornaments. Their story is warm and full of love. A testimony to tradition and craftsmanship, entangled with great dedication to their brand.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

“ Mishelino” studio is a collaboration of two artists. We live and create in Ukraine. Before the creation of “Mishelino”, each of us was interested in different genres of art in his own way: painting, graphics, illustration and sculpture. Today, all this is harmoniously combined at the heart of our creative process.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Initially, the main art object in our work is a tree ornament made of papiemache. Each piece is an anthropomorphic character made by hand from the beginning to the end, from the creation of the frame to the painting. Every time the process of creating an ornament is like a game. You may have a ready-made idea, but papiemache will always make you play with him properly according to his rules. In this game, you need to manage to catch the intended character as successfully as possible for that cute ear, for a suitable paw or a perfect nose.

Grab and hold the image both in your head and with your hands, because papiemache instantly responds to the movement of the artist's hands, offering more and more new details of the character's image. The game will end when the character comes to life in your hands. 

According to our observations, any idea still continues to transform and improve at each of the stages of creation. This is an incredibly exciting process!

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

In the fall of 2017, we were sorting out old boxes and found a family collection of Christmas tree toys in one of them. It is amazing that these small fragile antique toys became our guide to the world of childhood. They easily immerse us in warm memories of family holidays and faith in goodness and miracle. Somehow, we suddenly wanted to be involved in this enchantment, in the magic of ancient technologies of creating Christmas decorations in the papiemache technique. 

That's how our story with Mishelino began. 

In October 2017, we have created our own author's papiemache technology that would ideally suit our requests for creating art pieces. 

Each of the characters is in unique piece, and some of them create entire collections. Such as the collection of Christmas ornaments "Zhakikoo". 

Zhakikoo is the main character. He's a traveler and he always wears a red hat. Little Zhakikoo travels around the world, friends with cachalots and other animals, flies into space, and even has been to the Moon. We were inspired to create him by the French researcher Jacques Yves Cousteau. 

This is one of the favorite heroes of our collectors.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

If we take the biography of any of the artists at the beginning of their creative path, almost every one of them experienced  painful doubts about the correctness of the chosen way.

 We believe that you should do what you want and not to listen to anyone. Just believe in yourself!

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Working in “Mishelino” is an endless flight of imagination. Mishelino's creation was based on the idea of a craft Christmas ornament. But as time goes on, there are more and more ideas. And we embody some of the ideas in painting and sculpture. Each character is like a small puzzle of a single piece. They are both independent characters, but also easily fit into the overall picture of Mishelino's world.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

The main material in our work is papiemache. We have studied and developed the author's technique of creating artworks from this material. 

Initially, the Christmas tree toys of our childhood were made of papiermache. In a wonderful way, it keeps the warmth of the hands and the soul that the author invests in its creation. The material is durable, lightweight and eco-friendly. 

We would really like to preserve the ancient traditions of paiemache with our creativity not only in the Christmas ornaments, but also in art in general.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is one of the chances here and now to stop and look at the World from a different angle.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Mishelino Studio for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Waiting for inspiration can be a difficult time. It cannot be forced or taken when you want to. It needs to be nurtured, developed, and fed. Paths to inspiration are different and unique for each one of us. But it is always helpful to hear someone else experience and try to find a similar spark within yourself. The duo behind the Mishelino Studio found their inspiration in the ancient technique of paper-mâché while searching through old family Christmas ornaments. Their story is warm and full of love. A testimony to tradition and craftsmanship, entangled with great dedication to their brand.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

“ Mishelino” studio is a collaboration of two artists. We live and create in Ukraine. Before the creation of “Mishelino”, each of us was interested in different genres of art in his own way: painting, graphics, illustration and sculpture. Today, all this is harmoniously combined at the heart of our creative process.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Initially, the main art object in our work is a tree ornament made of papiemache. Each piece is an anthropomorphic character made by hand from the beginning to the end, from the creation of the frame to the painting. Every time the process of creating an ornament is like a game. You may have a ready-made idea, but papiemache will always make you play with him properly according to his rules. In this game, you need to manage to catch the intended character as successfully as possible for that cute ear, for a suitable paw or a perfect nose.

Grab and hold the image both in your head and with your hands, because papiemache instantly responds to the movement of the artist's hands, offering more and more new details of the character's image. The game will end when the character comes to life in your hands. 

According to our observations, any idea still continues to transform and improve at each of the stages of creation. This is an incredibly exciting process!

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

In the fall of 2017, we were sorting out old boxes and found a family collection of Christmas tree toys in one of them. It is amazing that these small fragile antique toys became our guide to the world of childhood. They easily immerse us in warm memories of family holidays and faith in goodness and miracle. Somehow, we suddenly wanted to be involved in this enchantment, in the magic of ancient technologies of creating Christmas decorations in the papiemache technique. 

That's how our story with Mishelino began. 

In October 2017, we have created our own author's papiemache technology that would ideally suit our requests for creating art pieces. 

Each of the characters is in unique piece, and some of them create entire collections. Such as the collection of Christmas ornaments "Zhakikoo". 

Zhakikoo is the main character. He's a traveler and he always wears a red hat. Little Zhakikoo travels around the world, friends with cachalots and other animals, flies into space, and even has been to the Moon. We were inspired to create him by the French researcher Jacques Yves Cousteau. 

This is one of the favorite heroes of our collectors.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

If we take the biography of any of the artists at the beginning of their creative path, almost every one of them experienced  painful doubts about the correctness of the chosen way.

 We believe that you should do what you want and not to listen to anyone. Just believe in yourself!

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

Working in “Mishelino” is an endless flight of imagination. Mishelino's creation was based on the idea of a craft Christmas ornament. But as time goes on, there are more and more ideas. And we embody some of the ideas in painting and sculpture. Each character is like a small puzzle of a single piece. They are both independent characters, but also easily fit into the overall picture of Mishelino's world.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

The main material in our work is papiemache. We have studied and developed the author's technique of creating artworks from this material. 

Initially, the Christmas tree toys of our childhood were made of papiermache. In a wonderful way, it keeps the warmth of the hands and the soul that the author invests in its creation. The material is durable, lightweight and eco-friendly. 

We would really like to preserve the ancient traditions of paiemache with our creativity not only in the Christmas ornaments, but also in art in general.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is one of the chances here and now to stop and look at the World from a different angle.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Mishelino Studio for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

In a constant rush that we call life, we end up hitting a wall. Very personal, with all sorts of cracks and holes. All sorts of color, sound, and sorrow. Maybe you were lucky and didn't yet see yours, but you might felt its presence. The silent presence of fear... A thought: "We might hit it next time. Will we break it? Or it will break us like it broke many people around us."
It is important to know, that every wall is built brick by brick. And there is no human being that can break it with its fist. The same way we build it, let's unpack it. Brick by brick.
Here at Fourline Design, we love to turn to our favorite medium - ART. And although you might find it ignorant and funny, art is a powerful force. Art can heal. Creative therapy is a form of therapy that involves a person receiving treatment through art-based activities. That's right! And we will repeat it again - Art can heal people.
But if you still have doubt, lovely Marianne that stands behind MLindDolls brand, will solve it for good. Enjoy reading the lovely chat we had with her.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

My name is Marianne. I am a dollmaker and I live in Estonia, a tiny country on the Baltic Sea coast. I have always been creative and actually wanted to become a writer, but around 5-6 years ago I suffered a major writer's block after the death of a few of my close friends. So instead of writing my way out of grief,  I began making things with my hands as creative therapy and eventually discovered that I was able to tell stories again, just not in words, but visual stories, using wool as a medium. Thanks to this practice I am slowly finding my way back to writing as well.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I am inspired by Nature and the materials I use: botanically dyed fibres and fabrics. I often have a dream about my characters and then have to bring them to life. Most of the time I start with an idea, but the end result depends very much on the process, too, as wool has a mind of its own, and often I have to take it into account. So it is more of a collaboration with wool... often the piece itself leading the way.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I started working with my hands to work through my grief, and many of my collectors have also found solace in my work when they're going through a difficult period. I wish to create a little happiness with my work, and give comfort to those who might need it. My work is earthy and grounding, and sweet, and lambs wool is warm to the touch.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

For me, the main struggles are related to money and overworking. I don't like taking care of the business-side of things, or selling my work. I wish I could give it all away for free, but I also have to pay the bills.. I also struggle a lot with time management - I usually work way too long hours, and forget to take a break when I am in the flow. Due to this, I have burned out twice in the last 6 years. At the moment I am taking some time off from my art practice to spend time with my 9-month-old daughter, and to gain some perspective on where to go from here. My advice is to work hard, but to give yourself some rest, too, and not spend too much time worrying if your work is selling enough, is original enough, if you're enough. Just do your own heart's work.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I think I do both. Sometimes I like to create elaborate, one of a kind pieces, but they all fit into the story I wish to tell with my work.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece? 

I work with natural materials, especially the humble lambs wool. I love using undervalued and coarse natural fibers, adding some additional magic and love, and create something beautiful out of it. You can dye and felt lambs wool yarn, and there is always an element of surprise involved when I work with wool. Each piece felts differently, depending on the heat, water quality and soap used. I love working with plant-dyed Estonian lambs wool, as it is imbued with the creative energy of my home.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is akin to breathing for me, a refuge and a way to find and create meaning. It is how I communicate with the world, and how I make sense of my place in it. It also is a way to step out of the current, and just be in the moment.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Marianne for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.
In a constant rush that we call life, we end up hitting a wall. Very personal, with all sorts of cracks and holes. All sorts of color, sound, and sorrow. Maybe you were lucky and didn't yet see yours, but you might felt its presence. The silent presence of fear... A thought: "We might hit it next time. Will we break it? Or it will break us like it broke many people around us."
It is important to know, that every wall is built brick by brick. And there is no human being that can break it with its fist. The same way we build it, let's unpack it. Brick by brick.
Here at Fourline Design, we love to turn to our favorite medium - ART. And although you might find it ignorant and funny, art is a powerful force. Art can heal. Creative therapy is a form of therapy that involves a person receiving treatment through art-based activities. That's right! And we will repeat it again - Art can heal people.
But if you still have doubt, lovely Marianne that stands behind MLindDolls brand, will solve it for good. Enjoy reading the lovely chat we had with her.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

My name is Marianne. I am a dollmaker and I live in Estonia, a tiny country on the Baltic Sea coast. I have always been creative and actually wanted to become a writer, but around 5-6 years ago I suffered a major writer's block after the death of a few of my close friends. So instead of writing my way out of grief,  I began making things with my hands as creative therapy and eventually discovered that I was able to tell stories again, just not in words, but visual stories, using wool as a medium. Thanks to this practice I am slowly finding my way back to writing as well.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I am inspired by Nature and the materials I use: botanically dyed fibres and fabrics. I often have a dream about my characters and then have to bring them to life. Most of the time I start with an idea, but the end result depends very much on the process, too, as wool has a mind of its own, and often I have to take it into account. So it is more of a collaboration with wool... often the piece itself leading the way.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I started working with my hands to work through my grief, and many of my collectors have also found solace in my work when they're going through a difficult period. I wish to create a little happiness with my work, and give comfort to those who might need it. My work is earthy and grounding, and sweet, and lambs wool is warm to the touch.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

For me, the main struggles are related to money and overworking. I don't like taking care of the business-side of things, or selling my work. I wish I could give it all away for free, but I also have to pay the bills.. I also struggle a lot with time management - I usually work way too long hours, and forget to take a break when I am in the flow. Due to this, I have burned out twice in the last 6 years. At the moment I am taking some time off from my art practice to spend time with my 9-month-old daughter, and to gain some perspective on where to go from here. My advice is to work hard, but to give yourself some rest, too, and not spend too much time worrying if your work is selling enough, is original enough, if you're enough. Just do your own heart's work.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I think I do both. Sometimes I like to create elaborate, one of a kind pieces, but they all fit into the story I wish to tell with my work.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece? 

I work with natural materials, especially the humble lambs wool. I love using undervalued and coarse natural fibers, adding some additional magic and love, and create something beautiful out of it. You can dye and felt lambs wool yarn, and there is always an element of surprise involved when I work with wool. Each piece felts differently, depending on the heat, water quality and soap used. I love working with plant-dyed Estonian lambs wool, as it is imbued with the creative energy of my home.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is akin to breathing for me, a refuge and a way to find and create meaning. It is how I communicate with the world, and how I make sense of my place in it. It also is a way to step out of the current, and just be in the moment.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Marianne for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

We can all agree that clean nature is essential for all living species. But, am I the only one that notices the distancing point of that sentence? All living species... People distance themselves from nature, in many ways. The truth is: Nature is essential for OUR being. All the great evolutions of mankind gave us prosperity, developed science, medical protection, and many more. But I cannot get rid of one thought, they all lead us to one fatal condition - distancing from nature. Living in tune with nature is a life of abundance. The opulence measured in physical health, mental health, and gratefulness. A balanced happy life that we are in constant search for.
What we love about Elisa Ceramics is the close connection she has with nature. Her art is simple and playfully portrays all-natural shapes and forms. The poetic details on her pottery, bring us closer to the earth. With charm and skills, she is creating a thin line between manmade and nature.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I'm Elisa and I'm Italian. I've always been creative and fascinated by clay, but mostly worked in an office. The lockdown, in its strangeness, gave me the opportunity to take the plunge and start playing with clay. Until it turned into something bigger - and here I am now.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

The first emotion that drives me toward creating an art piece is excitement, I get the idea and I get super excited to create it and look forward to the outcome too. Most of the times I plan the creation of all my pieces, so I usually make drawings and start from there. However sometimes I just grab a piece of clay and let my hands do the job!

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I mostly take inspiration from nature, in its many forms. I go for a walk in the park, sit in my garden and I simply give shape to what I see using clay, but at the same time giving a unique quirky twist to all my creations. 

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

The most struggling part of making a living with my art is being able to sell my products, most people don't get that every little piece is handmade and takes lot of time, and so sometimes they are not willing to pay the price . My advise to all new artists is to start little, it's from the little steps that you get to climb a big stair!

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I usually prefer single pieces, but I also love to work on big projects. In both cases I usually plan in advance, make drawings and try to focus on the outcome.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece? 

I've always loved clay and that is why I use it to create my pieces. It's amazing to see what comes out just from a piece of clay, using only your hands and a few tools.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Anything expressed with your mind and heart. It's incredible to see what emotions and feelings drive you to create.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Elisa for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

We can all agree that clean nature is essential for all living species. But, am I the only one that notices the distancing point of that sentence? All living species... People distance themselves from nature, in many ways. The truth is: Nature is essential for OUR being. All the great evolutions of mankind gave us prosperity, developed science, medical protection, and many more. But I cannot get rid of one thought, they all lead us to one fatal condition - distancing from nature. Living in tune with nature is a life of abundance. The opulence measured in physical health, mental health, and gratefulness. A balanced happy life that we are in constant search for.
What we love about Elisa Ceramics is the close connection she has with nature. Her art is simple and playfully portrays all-natural shapes and forms. The poetic details on her pottery, bring us closer to the earth. With charm and skills, she is creating a thin line between manmade and nature.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I'm Elisa and I'm Italian. I've always been creative and fascinated by clay, but mostly worked in an office. The lockdown, in its strangeness, gave me the opportunity to take the plunge and start playing with clay. Until it turned into something bigger - and here I am now.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

The first emotion that drives me toward creating an art piece is excitement, I get the idea and I get super excited to create it and look forward to the outcome too. Most of the times I plan the creation of all my pieces, so I usually make drawings and start from there. However sometimes I just grab a piece of clay and let my hands do the job!

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I mostly take inspiration from nature, in its many forms. I go for a walk in the park, sit in my garden and I simply give shape to what I see using clay, but at the same time giving a unique quirky twist to all my creations. 

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

The most struggling part of making a living with my art is being able to sell my products, most people don't get that every little piece is handmade and takes lot of time, and so sometimes they are not willing to pay the price . My advise to all new artists is to start little, it's from the little steps that you get to climb a big stair!

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I usually prefer single pieces, but I also love to work on big projects. In both cases I usually plan in advance, make drawings and try to focus on the outcome.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece? 

I've always loved clay and that is why I use it to create my pieces. It's amazing to see what comes out just from a piece of clay, using only your hands and a few tools.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Anything expressed with your mind and heart. It's incredible to see what emotions and feelings drive you to create.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Elisa for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

In our most creative journeys, we have to dig deep into the layers of our subconscious. What is that feeling that wakes you up in the morning? From where comes the need to create and express ourselves in a nonconventional way? Where did it all start?
We are the generation that celebrates uniqueness. Our lives represent a unique journey entangled with our talents and personal qualities. The foundations of each life journey come from our childhood. And Unexpected Lullaby is no exception to that. She embraced her inner child and build up a whole new dimension with her artwork. Celebrating nature with deep dive into her craft. Just take a look at the exceptional detailing on her figurines!

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I'm from Barcelona, Spain and am currently living at the other end of the world in Nashvile, TN with my husband and my dog Bean. My dad loved making models and since we were little he always gave us all the tools to do arts and crafts to pass our time. I remember summer afternoons painting rocks and making plaster figurines with my sister. There's something magical about transforming raw materials into something else.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Excitement. Every time I get a new idea I really want to try, I get excited about all the possibilities to bring it to life. Sometimes it's just wanting to do something with my hands; it is a soothing feeling doing manual work. When I'm stressed out, or need a mental break, creating something helps me put my mind at ease. I usually let my ideas settle for some days. Doing that allows me to give it a second thought, adding more value to it. Other times I'm so excited about an idea that I can't wait and have to make it immediately. Those times I let the emotion go wild and simply have fun.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

Since I was a kid I have always loved animals. Fascinated by them, I watched all kinds of documentaries and cut photos from magazines. I recalled how the tiny and cute fauna of my hometown in Spain would always make me smile. From the colorful parrots that invaded the city when I was 10, to the little snails showing up on rainy days, I have always loved watching them and now I want to recreate that feeling.

The first time I was introduced to clay I knew what I wanted to do, handcraft smiles through the use of tiny figurines.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

Making a living out of art is hard. I struggle a lot and mostly on social media. I think we all want to reach as many people as quickly as possible but growing your niche takes time. I would say to take it easy and to celebrate every little win because even the smallest one is a step closer to your goal.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer single pieces, as I enjoy variation and diversity. While together they might not have anything in common, they are single stories to tell that share the basics that I have learned through my art experiences.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

My main material is clay and glazes, but I also love to experiment with other crafts and mediums to add to my pieces. It is something fascinating giving another spin to a seemingly finished piece. It's an extra level of fun that I can add to it.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

To me art is an everyday thing. From the little figurine that makes you smile at home to your choice of clothing or accessories. It is an expression of what you like and makes you passionate about. Everything that you create that gives an emotional response to someone else. Creating pieces having in mind how the other person will smile upon seeing them is one of my joys.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Eva for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

In our most creative journeys, we have to dig deep into the layers of our subconscious. What is that feeling that wakes you up in the morning? From where comes the need to create and express ourselves in a nonconventional way? Where did it all start?
We are the generation that celebrates uniqueness. Our lives represent a unique journey entangled with our talents and personal qualities. The foundations of each life journey come from our childhood. And Unexpected Lullaby is no exception to that. She embraced her inner child and build up a whole new dimension with her artwork. Celebrating nature with deep dive into her craft. Just take a look at the exceptional detailing on her figurines!

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I'm from Barcelona, Spain and am currently living at the other end of the world in Nashvile, TN with my husband and my dog Bean. My dad loved making models and since we were little he always gave us all the tools to do arts and crafts to pass our time. I remember summer afternoons painting rocks and making plaster figurines with my sister. There's something magical about transforming raw materials into something else.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Excitement. Every time I get a new idea I really want to try, I get excited about all the possibilities to bring it to life. Sometimes it's just wanting to do something with my hands; it is a soothing feeling doing manual work. When I'm stressed out, or need a mental break, creating something helps me put my mind at ease. I usually let my ideas settle for some days. Doing that allows me to give it a second thought, adding more value to it. Other times I'm so excited about an idea that I can't wait and have to make it immediately. Those times I let the emotion go wild and simply have fun.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

Since I was a kid I have always loved animals. Fascinated by them, I watched all kinds of documentaries and cut photos from magazines. I recalled how the tiny and cute fauna of my hometown in Spain would always make me smile. From the colorful parrots that invaded the city when I was 10, to the little snails showing up on rainy days, I have always loved watching them and now I want to recreate that feeling.

The first time I was introduced to clay I knew what I wanted to do, handcraft smiles through the use of tiny figurines.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

Making a living out of art is hard. I struggle a lot and mostly on social media. I think we all want to reach as many people as quickly as possible but growing your niche takes time. I would say to take it easy and to celebrate every little win because even the smallest one is a step closer to your goal.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer single pieces, as I enjoy variation and diversity. While together they might not have anything in common, they are single stories to tell that share the basics that I have learned through my art experiences.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

My main material is clay and glazes, but I also love to experiment with other crafts and mediums to add to my pieces. It is something fascinating giving another spin to a seemingly finished piece. It's an extra level of fun that I can add to it.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

To me art is an everyday thing. From the little figurine that makes you smile at home to your choice of clothing or accessories. It is an expression of what you like and makes you passionate about. Everything that you create that gives an emotional response to someone else. Creating pieces having in mind how the other person will smile upon seeing them is one of my joys.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Eva for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.
I have always been a hopeless dreamer. In love with music, painting, sculptures, and art in general. Sometimes I feel that it captivates my every sense. Silence the rest of the world and I live in that moment. My every sense is captivated and fully committed to the vibrations that art gives to me. You can see how my face lightens up, and you can even spot a smile full of love. Like I am looking at my first crush like love is opening the doors to me.
From modern history, I appreciate the most "world wide web". You may find it silly, but how else I would get a chance to meet Malsart! The intense detailing on her paintings is more than captivating. Her art takes you on a journey. Romantically presented as snapshots of emotions, as parts of a much deeper inner journey.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

Hi! I am Maldha, I am from the Maldives and you might know me as Malsart on Instagram. The art journey started for me ever since I was practically a toddler scribbling away on a piece of paper and has stuck with me ever since until today where I am 23 years old now!

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

The first emotion that drives me toward creating an art piece is mostly procrastination. This might sound weird at first, but when I generally get an idea in my head, it takes me forever to actually get it on paper. It is the eventual pressure from my own procrastination that actually lights my mind on fire to go create. However, once I begin I do not know how to stop and could go for hours to the point where I am unable to eat or sleep until I finish the process. Once I get into the flow, it is almost as if my mind cant stop until the vision in my head lays out before me.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

The backstory for my art has always been everything around me practically. It started off with a lot of experimentation. From still life, to pan pastels, to watercolors and then eventually on to oil paints and impasto, which are my main mediums. It has definitely been a process, as my style has also evolved as I experimented from surrealism, to hyperrealism now. As for the transferring my vision to other people, I generally do not mind and actually prefer to see the way other people interpret my work. I think its very fascinating what people have to say about it, even if its constructive criticism.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

As a full time artist, the main struggle I have personally faced has been mostly limitations I have to deal with due to my demographic. Coming from a small South Asian country practically forgotten & surrounded by the deep blue sea, the main challenge is the lack of a proper art community, along with lack of access to proper art supplies. This causes great hassles in terms of meeting deadlines, and finishing projects as sometimes I might have to wait about a month to receive a certain shade of paint as we have to order it from abroad and wait ages to receive it.

I have been lucky enough for my art to be recognized through social media as the opportunities I have received have mainly been through that, so the advice I would have for starter artists is to try to put your work out there for people to see and to continuously experiment until you find your groove so you can perfect what work for you best. Most importantly though, it is important to recognize that this is a difficult industry to grow in, and as a result a strong spirit and drive to create is essential to grow as an individual in this industry. However, it is also important to remember to not overwork yourself to the point that you enter art block, so finding and maintaining a healthy balance is crucial.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer single pieces as I like the idea of each piece encompassing and mirroring its own world to the viewer without having any correlation to the pieces around them. I try to make each individual piece stand out in terms of giving it certain life so that it can stand out on it’s own. That is usually the approach in most cases!

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use oil paint and impasto specifically because of how the texture looks and feels. I feel like oil paints are what feels most fluid for me, and it helps me blend and mix as I please while leaving such a nice consistency and hues. The impasto and the texture are my favorite parts of the painting process, as this is what I use to give my paintings the depth. The marriage of oil paint and impasto come together to make my paintings look so vivid and full of life, and that is why I feel like they are perfect for my art pieces.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art to me is a form of salvation. It has helped me make the most out of life. Art is so important to me because it contributes greatly to who I am as a person and my way of expressing and regulating my emotions because I am not a very vocal person about most things. More than anything, art has helped me find out about who I am as a person, and has been one of the consistent things in my life that has always been there for me, so as a result art is very important to me and something I hold dear to me.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Maldha for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

I have always been a hopeless dreamer. In love with music, painting, sculptures, and art in general. Sometimes I feel that it captivates my every sense. Silence the rest of the world and I live in that moment. My every sense is captivated and fully committed to the vibrations that art gives to me. You can see how my face lightens up, and you can even spot a smile full of love. Like I am looking at my first crush like love is opening the doors to me.
From modern history, I appreciate the most "world wide web". You may find it silly, but how else I would get a chance to meet Malsart! The intense detailing on her paintings is more than captivating. Her art takes you on a journey. Romantically presented as snapshots of emotions, as parts of a much deeper inner journey.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

Hi! I am Maldha, I am from the Maldives and you might know me as Malsart on Instagram. The art journey started for me ever since I was practically a toddler scribbling away on a piece of paper and has stuck with me ever since until today where I am 23 years old now!

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

The first emotion that drives me toward creating an art piece is mostly procrastination. This might sound weird at first, but when I generally get an idea in my head, it takes me forever to actually get it on paper. It is the eventual pressure from my own procrastination that actually lights my mind on fire to go create. However, once I begin I do not know how to stop and could go for hours to the point where I am unable to eat or sleep until I finish the process. Once I get into the flow, it is almost as if my mind cant stop until the vision in my head lays out before me.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

The backstory for my art has always been everything around me practically. It started off with a lot of experimentation. From still life, to pan pastels, to watercolors and then eventually on to oil paints and impasto, which are my main mediums. It has definitely been a process, as my style has also evolved as I experimented from surrealism, to hyperrealism now. As for the transferring my vision to other people, I generally do not mind and actually prefer to see the way other people interpret my work. I think its very fascinating what people have to say about it, even if its constructive criticism.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

As a full time artist, the main struggle I have personally faced has been mostly limitations I have to deal with due to my demographic. Coming from a small South Asian country practically forgotten & surrounded by the deep blue sea, the main challenge is the lack of a proper art community, along with lack of access to proper art supplies. This causes great hassles in terms of meeting deadlines, and finishing projects as sometimes I might have to wait about a month to receive a certain shade of paint as we have to order it from abroad and wait ages to receive it.

I have been lucky enough for my art to be recognized through social media as the opportunities I have received have mainly been through that, so the advice I would have for starter artists is to try to put your work out there for people to see and to continuously experiment until you find your groove so you can perfect what work for you best. Most importantly though, it is important to recognize that this is a difficult industry to grow in, and as a result a strong spirit and drive to create is essential to grow as an individual in this industry. However, it is also important to remember to not overwork yourself to the point that you enter art block, so finding and maintaining a healthy balance is crucial.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer single pieces as I like the idea of each piece encompassing and mirroring its own world to the viewer without having any correlation to the pieces around them. I try to make each individual piece stand out in terms of giving it certain life so that it can stand out on it’s own. That is usually the approach in most cases!

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use oil paint and impasto specifically because of how the texture looks and feels. I feel like oil paints are what feels most fluid for me, and it helps me blend and mix as I please while leaving such a nice consistency and hues. The impasto and the texture are my favorite parts of the painting process, as this is what I use to give my paintings the depth. The marriage of oil paint and impasto come together to make my paintings look so vivid and full of life, and that is why I feel like they are perfect for my art pieces.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art to me is a form of salvation. It has helped me make the most out of life. Art is so important to me because it contributes greatly to who I am as a person and my way of expressing and regulating my emotions because I am not a very vocal person about most things. More than anything, art has helped me find out about who I am as a person, and has been one of the consistent things in my life that has always been there for me, so as a result art is very important to me and something I hold dear to me.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Maldha for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Do you take a risk in your life? Do you push yourself towards new experiences? To be honest, every single one of us values comfort in life. It is in our nature to feel safe and to avoid stress.
That's why it is always a great pleasure and inspiration to encounter people who work differently. People that have strong grit to take things to the next level. To have an open heart and a different view on life. Annette Janelle atelier is a place where she explores her creativity. Always in her self-exploring world, she takes her art and gives it to the judgment of the world. Explores new designs, reinvents old ones, and creates an exciting experience. While always communicating with her loving audience. Taking the best from every critique, and learning while nurturing her creativity.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I've lived in Arizona since I was a little kid, so I consider myself an Arizona native even though I wasn't born here. I grew up in Phoenix and currently live in Payson. My art journey has been a long and winding one. I started out with the basics every child has, but I knew I had a talent for it early on and never stopped creating. I recall selling some drawings of horses to classmates in grade school for 25 cents, so it's clear my ambition has been with me my entire life. In high school I focused mainly on drawing and illustration. I had the opportunity to take a ceramics class and loved it, but had no further access to the medium until community college where I took Ceramics 101, fell deeply in love with clay, and settled into my chosen medium from that point onward. It's still the only college-level ceramics class I've taken, so my progress since then is all self-taught. Prior to that fateful ceramics class I had hoped to become a watercolor illustrator, and I still use my illustrative skill and style often when decorating my work. I've been exclusively an independent ceramist for over a year now, since leaving my part-time marketing job last September, and I honestly can't imagine anything else being an appropriate career for me.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I don't think it's so much an emotion as a compulsion. I've always had this need to create, and that's what drives me. My hands hate being idle. I love to watch my creations come to life in my hands and exist in three dimensions. With ceramics, it's like the object has a life of its own, especially the characters I create, as if I'm a conduit guiding a spirit into stone. Emotion is evoked by the piece itself -- the most common comments I receive from my buyers are about how much joy they get from the presence of my art in their homes. In terms of creative process, I like to indulge my spontaneity. Of course it depends on the project I'm working on. Sometimes I do have a more established plan or vision of what the piece should look like in the end. I find that, more often than not, if I sit on an idea for too long, I won't actually start it because another idea will pop up and take over my attention. My best work is usually spontaneous in nature with a sort of shotgun approach (as much as that can be applied to ceramics) where I am inspired, and I start and complete at least the initial sculptural stage of the piece in a short span of time. 

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

Broadly, my most successful current work is focused on human identity and our relationship to nature and the universe. It references the ways in which we relate to the world around us and reach for meaning in the universe beyond. More specifically, my most popular current work was inspired by a pet peeve. I've reliably observed that in mainstream contemporary art it is so much more common to see female nudity than male nudity. People tend to be more shocked and offended by male nudity than female nudity, and that really, really bugs me a lot. Like, SO MUCH. I don't intend my work to be shocking or sexual, and I don't think it comes off like that, because it's just so darn pretty and humorous and pure, but it should raise questions about inequity among the sexes and disproportionate sexualization of females over males. It's the reason I started making nude figure pots and mugs, and giving equal time if not even a little extra time to the nude male figures to make up for the oversaturation of female nudity. My driving concepts and focuses have changed over time, but that's a decent description of my most current work. As artists, our work should evolve as we do, and I'm certain that my focus will shift sometime in the future as I continue to grow as an artist.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

The biggest one is financial security of course. Here in the United States, not having access to a truly affordable and comprehensive healthcare plan option is probably my biggest source of anxiety these days ($15K+ deductible with a $350+ premium is not affordable - looking at you Affordable Care Act). I started a Patreon page back in April of this year and that has been surprisingly successful. I'm fortunate to have an employed spouse to share living expenses with, but I still get a flurry of anxiety every month before I do a shop update, so I suppose managing anxiety is probably my biggest struggle. My income largely depends on how much work I'm able to finish and sell in a month, and ceramics is very time consuming and process intensive. It's difficult to balance my work, other responsibilities, and vital recreation and relaxation time. 
My advice for starting artists is to begin by dipping your toes in, and just keep pushing deeper a little at a time. Try different things, and pay attention to what works and what doesn't, adapt to changes when they come. Raise your prices if you consistently sell out of a particular design. Do anything and everything you need to do to nurture your innate creativity and keep it strong and fruitful. Indulge in experimentation from time to time, and build on your skills. You learn more from failure than you do from success. When your income from your art is enough to support your cost of living without another job, that's a good time to take the leap! When you get there you have to stay strong and determined and make sure you are not undervaluing your work. It takes a surprising amount of discipline, time management, and mental and emotional fortitude to maintain an independent art career. It's not for everyone, but if you have the talent and you want it and are willing to work for it, you can do it. It took me a long time to find my footing in my own niche and develop a body of work that sells well enough to support my expenses, and I've ended up pretty far from where I thought I was going back in high school when I had dreams of illustrating children's books. Your timeline and career path is your own - try not to compare yourself to others and remember that success looks different for everyone. That's a lot of advice!

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I mostly create one-offs. I'm not the sort of artist that likes to repeat themselves - I get very bored if I have to do that and when I'm bored the quality of my work suffers because my heart isn't in it, so I avoid rigid repetition as a rule. I will riff on a successful design to create similar works that I am confident about selling, but everything I make is one of a kind. I approach them as individual works, with individual personalities that come to life throughout the sculpting process. The details, features, and proportions are informed by the basic form of the piece. They come to life and develop their characteristics as I sculpt them. It almost feels like giving a body to a spirit in a way. This is my preferred method of working, where I feel the flow of creativity from within and from that unknown source that seems to be outside my conscious awareness. I've done a few series works in the past, and these are more planned. I have an overall idea for the series, and how the pieces relate to one another in progression, then the individual pieces of the series I create in much the same way as my other works, letting the details emerge through the creation process. I'm more of a character builder than a storyteller with my art. I have a deep love of story, but I've never had much of a talent for creating narratives myself. I think that's why I'm so good at evoking character in my work - because I have a great desire to consume narrative, anyone with a talent for storytelling could easily build one around any given piece of mine. I'd love to collaborate with writers in this way one day.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

My chosen medium is porcelain. It's timeless, ancient and modern at the same time. It's beautiful, tactile, a pristine canvas for painted detail and pliable sculpting medium with amazing potential for rendering ultrafine detail. It's just challenging enough to keep me on my toes with its finicky nature. It has the potential to outlive me by millennia, and can be used for functional and utilitarian works as well as purely decorative art. It's delicate but resilient and timeless. It's like the precious stone of clays. With porcelain as the base for all my works, I also use other materials to embellish and finish them including underglaze for colorful details, glaze to finish for functionality, and gold luster overglaze for that extra bit of luxury here and there on pieces that call for such an embellishment. There's also the delayed gratification aspect of ceramics. Each step in the process takes you a little bit closer to seeing the finished piece, with each step informing the next process - and even though I know my materials, the finished piece can still be a surprise.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is so many things. It's any form of expression that is beautiful to behold or meaningful to experience. I am not one to insist that every piece of art needs a fully fledged thesis regarding its meaning to be considered art - in fact I find that stance so restrictive and overly-intellectualized as to be anti-artistic. Certainly all those elaborately written theses lend additional depth of understanding to a piece, but it's not necessary with all artworks. It is often enough that a piece of art is simply beautiful, evokes an emotion, comes from a place of creative potential and is executed with evident talent. For me, the only true requisite function of art is to evoke.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Annette Janelle for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.
Do you take a risk in your life? Do you push yourself towards new experiences? To be honest, every single one of us values comfort in life. It is in our nature to feel safe and to avoid stress.
That's why it is always a great pleasure and inspiration to encounter people who work differently. People that have strong grit to take things to the next level. To have an open heart and a different view on life. Annette Janelle atelier is a place where she explores her creativity. Always in her self-exploring world, she takes her art and gives it to the judgment of the world. Explores new designs, reinvents old ones, and creates an exciting experience. While always communicating with her loving audience. Taking the best from every critique, and learning while nurturing her creativity.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

I've lived in Arizona since I was a little kid, so I consider myself an Arizona native even though I wasn't born here. I grew up in Phoenix and currently live in Payson. My art journey has been a long and winding one. I started out with the basics every child has, but I knew I had a talent for it early on and never stopped creating. I recall selling some drawings of horses to classmates in grade school for 25 cents, so it's clear my ambition has been with me my entire life. In high school I focused mainly on drawing and illustration. I had the opportunity to take a ceramics class and loved it, but had no further access to the medium until community college where I took Ceramics 101, fell deeply in love with clay, and settled into my chosen medium from that point onward. It's still the only college-level ceramics class I've taken, so my progress since then is all self-taught. Prior to that fateful ceramics class I had hoped to become a watercolor illustrator, and I still use my illustrative skill and style often when decorating my work. I've been exclusively an independent ceramist for over a year now, since leaving my part-time marketing job last September, and I honestly can't imagine anything else being an appropriate career for me.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I don't think it's so much an emotion as a compulsion. I've always had this need to create, and that's what drives me. My hands hate being idle. I love to watch my creations come to life in my hands and exist in three dimensions. With ceramics, it's like the object has a life of its own, especially the characters I create, as if I'm a conduit guiding a spirit into stone. Emotion is evoked by the piece itself -- the most common comments I receive from my buyers are about how much joy they get from the presence of my art in their homes. In terms of creative process, I like to indulge my spontaneity. Of course it depends on the project I'm working on. Sometimes I do have a more established plan or vision of what the piece should look like in the end. I find that, more often than not, if I sit on an idea for too long, I won't actually start it because another idea will pop up and take over my attention. My best work is usually spontaneous in nature with a sort of shotgun approach (as much as that can be applied to ceramics) where I am inspired, and I start and complete at least the initial sculptural stage of the piece in a short span of time. 

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

Broadly, my most successful current work is focused on human identity and our relationship to nature and the universe. It references the ways in which we relate to the world around us and reach for meaning in the universe beyond. More specifically, my most popular current work was inspired by a pet peeve. I've reliably observed that in mainstream contemporary art it is so much more common to see female nudity than male nudity. People tend to be more shocked and offended by male nudity than female nudity, and that really, really bugs me a lot. Like, SO MUCH. I don't intend my work to be shocking or sexual, and I don't think it comes off like that, because it's just so darn pretty and humorous and pure, but it should raise questions about inequity among the sexes and disproportionate sexualization of females over males. It's the reason I started making nude figure pots and mugs, and giving equal time if not even a little extra time to the nude male figures to make up for the oversaturation of female nudity. My driving concepts and focuses have changed over time, but that's a decent description of my most current work. As artists, our work should evolve as we do, and I'm certain that my focus will shift sometime in the future as I continue to grow as an artist.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

The biggest one is financial security of course. Here in the United States, not having access to a truly affordable and comprehensive healthcare plan option is probably my biggest source of anxiety these days ($15K+ deductible with a $350+ premium is not affordable - looking at you Affordable Care Act). I started a Patreon page back in April of this year and that has been surprisingly successful. I'm fortunate to have an employed spouse to share living expenses with, but I still get a flurry of anxiety every month before I do a shop update, so I suppose managing anxiety is probably my biggest struggle. My income largely depends on how much work I'm able to finish and sell in a month, and ceramics is very time consuming and process intensive. It's difficult to balance my work, other responsibilities, and vital recreation and relaxation time. 
My advice for starting artists is to begin by dipping your toes in, and just keep pushing deeper a little at a time. Try different things, and pay attention to what works and what doesn't, adapt to changes when they come. Raise your prices if you consistently sell out of a particular design. Do anything and everything you need to do to nurture your innate creativity and keep it strong and fruitful. Indulge in experimentation from time to time, and build on your skills. You learn more from failure than you do from success. When your income from your art is enough to support your cost of living without another job, that's a good time to take the leap! When you get there you have to stay strong and determined and make sure you are not undervaluing your work. It takes a surprising amount of discipline, time management, and mental and emotional fortitude to maintain an independent art career. It's not for everyone, but if you have the talent and you want it and are willing to work for it, you can do it. It took me a long time to find my footing in my own niche and develop a body of work that sells well enough to support my expenses, and I've ended up pretty far from where I thought I was going back in high school when I had dreams of illustrating children's books. Your timeline and career path is your own - try not to compare yourself to others and remember that success looks different for everyone. That's a lot of advice!

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I mostly create one-offs. I'm not the sort of artist that likes to repeat themselves - I get very bored if I have to do that and when I'm bored the quality of my work suffers because my heart isn't in it, so I avoid rigid repetition as a rule. I will riff on a successful design to create similar works that I am confident about selling, but everything I make is one of a kind. I approach them as individual works, with individual personalities that come to life throughout the sculpting process. The details, features, and proportions are informed by the basic form of the piece. They come to life and develop their characteristics as I sculpt them. It almost feels like giving a body to a spirit in a way. This is my preferred method of working, where I feel the flow of creativity from within and from that unknown source that seems to be outside my conscious awareness. I've done a few series works in the past, and these are more planned. I have an overall idea for the series, and how the pieces relate to one another in progression, then the individual pieces of the series I create in much the same way as my other works, letting the details emerge through the creation process. I'm more of a character builder than a storyteller with my art. I have a deep love of story, but I've never had much of a talent for creating narratives myself. I think that's why I'm so good at evoking character in my work - because I have a great desire to consume narrative, anyone with a talent for storytelling could easily build one around any given piece of mine. I'd love to collaborate with writers in this way one day.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

My chosen medium is porcelain. It's timeless, ancient and modern at the same time. It's beautiful, tactile, a pristine canvas for painted detail and pliable sculpting medium with amazing potential for rendering ultrafine detail. It's just challenging enough to keep me on my toes with its finicky nature. It has the potential to outlive me by millennia, and can be used for functional and utilitarian works as well as purely decorative art. It's delicate but resilient and timeless. It's like the precious stone of clays. With porcelain as the base for all my works, I also use other materials to embellish and finish them including underglaze for colorful details, glaze to finish for functionality, and gold luster overglaze for that extra bit of luxury here and there on pieces that call for such an embellishment. There's also the delayed gratification aspect of ceramics. Each step in the process takes you a little bit closer to seeing the finished piece, with each step informing the next process - and even though I know my materials, the finished piece can still be a surprise.

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is so many things. It's any form of expression that is beautiful to behold or meaningful to experience. I am not one to insist that every piece of art needs a fully fledged thesis regarding its meaning to be considered art - in fact I find that stance so restrictive and overly-intellectualized as to be anti-artistic. Certainly all those elaborately written theses lend additional depth of understanding to a piece, but it's not necessary with all artworks. It is often enough that a piece of art is simply beautiful, evokes an emotion, comes from a place of creative potential and is executed with evident talent. For me, the only true requisite function of art is to evoke.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Annette Janelle for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

The charm of simplicity. We would like to have it in every aspect of life. From our aspirations to our passions. All the way to small guilty pleasures and instant gratifications. I cannot help myself and wonder... How much happier my life would be without overthinking, overcomplicating, and oversharing moments. If I would tone down a bit, life would feel easier.
That exact thought lead me to connect with a cute brand Selsius. Where everything is simple but in fact unique. Where multiply details don't seem too much. The refined taste is what makes them thrilling and seductive.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

We are from Turkey. A couple, wife and husband who had been into mud and object design for about near 10 years. Rolled out our own atelier 2 years ago currently producing handmade porcelain cups and glad to see they are used worldwide , loved by everyone.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Its an unstoppable moment, when something pops in your mind and you directly want to show it on your piece. We can say never we bake instead we count days to see the result.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

We have a base story behind all our products, to show the elegancy in a energic and warm color palettes. Always say when you hold a selsius cup, you should say "that's more than a cup".

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

We appreciate the love from our followers and customers. They keep and say its not enough which keeps us motivated. But at the same time it's putting a big pressure on us to deliver on time and keep the perfection on the same level.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

We prefer single pieces, as all our products have their own story, own experience, just like every human being's story.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Selsius Company for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

The charm of simplicity. We would like to have it in every aspect of life. From our aspirations to our passions. All the way to small guilty pleasures and instant gratifications. I cannot help myself and wonder... How much happier my life would be without overthinking, overcomplicating, and oversharing moments. If I would tone down a bit, life would feel easier.
That exact thought lead me to connect with a cute brand Selsius. Where everything is simple but in fact unique. Where multiply details don't seem too much. The refined taste is what makes them thrilling and seductive.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you?

We are from Turkey. A couple, wife and husband who had been into mud and object design for about near 10 years. Rolled out our own atelier 2 years ago currently producing handmade porcelain cups and glad to see they are used worldwide , loved by everyone.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Its an unstoppable moment, when something pops in your mind and you directly want to show it on your piece. We can say never we bake instead we count days to see the result.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

We have a base story behind all our products, to show the elegancy in a energic and warm color palettes. Always say when you hold a selsius cup, you should say "that's more than a cup".

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

We appreciate the love from our followers and customers. They keep and say its not enough which keeps us motivated. But at the same time it's putting a big pressure on us to deliver on time and keep the perfection on the same level.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

We prefer single pieces, as all our products have their own story, own experience, just like every human being's story.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Selsius Company for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

The world is explicit. It makes explicit turns. And it seems to us the more emotionless those turns appear - the more they imprint in our subconscious. That leaves us with all kinds of scars unhidden and those hidden. Honestly, I am always more worried about hidden ones. Not to go deep into the dark - those hidden scars are often the reason why some environments, people, and items attract us more than others. Why "trauma bonding" is one of the wheels of the car called life.

But today I want to connect in the same, deep, subconscious level with one bright direction. One pottery brand that is made to brighten our day! Elizabeth Di Prinzio is the woman that stands behind the amazing brand Earth + Element Ceramics. Her work blends with natural laws, and it is created out of passion and beauty.

Enjoy reading her wise thoughts!

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

I was born in San Jose, California, just a little south of San Francisco. My journey into art begin as a child. My grandmother was a painter and to keep us busy she sat us down with a blank canvas, a few colors and some paint brushes. She did not own a TV so our time was filled with arts and crafts.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time? 

I do a little of both. My creations come out of a place of wants and needs and I'll start the process, let is sit for six months and then revisit it once a new inspiration hits. Sometimes my piece will sit all year, or in some cases I never return back to it. I have to really love something in order to continue on.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people? 

I design from two places, as an artist and as an artist with a business. Making your vision come to life takes more than just me. I have to make sure I design what I feel is beautiful and what I believe my customers will also feel as beautiful. Asking myself "Is this functional AND beautiful?" the balance is a tipping scale to make sure you hit the mark with.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists? 

If you're going to start selling your art my advice is to change the way you view failures and struggles. It's never the end of the world when something goes wrong, it may feel that way, but really it's just a lesson that will help you grow and become a better business owner, maker, or artist. If you're not failing, you're not learning. I love a challenge and most people who start a businesses feel the same way.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case? 

Single piece storytelling for me is a way to convey a message, emotion or design in short. Since we mainly craft functionable tableware I prefer creating an entire collection that work together and last a lifetime. We want our customers to keep these pieces forever so while staying away from anything to niche or trendy is important, we also leave room for freedom of fun and playfulness.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece? 

There's a beautiful connection with taking earth materials and using the elements of water and fire to create art that will live beyond your own life span is one of the most special parts of working with clay. Since I am a nature lover it fits me well and feels good to create from the earth and for these pieces to perhaps one day go back into the earth.

What does ART, in general, mean to you? 

Art is a creation that first starts in your mind and vision, and with materials you're translating thoughts into actual forms. Art is a feeling of joy or sadness that you can express outside the body.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Elizabeth Di Prinzio for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

The world is explicit. It makes explicit turns. And it seems to us the more emotionless those turns appear - the more they imprint in our subconscious. That leaves us with all kinds of scars unhidden and those hidden. Honestly, I am always more worried about hidden ones. Not to go deep into the dark - those hidden scars are often the reason why some environments, people, and items attract us more than others. Why "trauma bonding" is one of the wheels of the car called life.

But today I want to connect in the same, deep, subconscious level with one bright direction. One pottery brand that is made to brighten our day! Elizabeth Di Prinzio is the woman that stands behind the amazing brand Earth + Element Ceramics. Her work blends with natural laws, and it is created out of passion and beauty.

Enjoy reading her wise thoughts!

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

I was born in San Jose, California, just a little south of San Francisco. My journey into art begin as a child. My grandmother was a painter and to keep us busy she sat us down with a blank canvas, a few colors and some paint brushes. She did not own a TV so our time was filled with arts and crafts.

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time? 

I do a little of both. My creations come out of a place of wants and needs and I'll start the process, let is sit for six months and then revisit it once a new inspiration hits. Sometimes my piece will sit all year, or in some cases I never return back to it. I have to really love something in order to continue on.

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people? 

I design from two places, as an artist and as an artist with a business. Making your vision come to life takes more than just me. I have to make sure I design what I feel is beautiful and what I believe my customers will also feel as beautiful. Asking myself "Is this functional AND beautiful?" the balance is a tipping scale to make sure you hit the mark with.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists? 

If you're going to start selling your art my advice is to change the way you view failures and struggles. It's never the end of the world when something goes wrong, it may feel that way, but really it's just a lesson that will help you grow and become a better business owner, maker, or artist. If you're not failing, you're not learning. I love a challenge and most people who start a businesses feel the same way.

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case? 

Single piece storytelling for me is a way to convey a message, emotion or design in short. Since we mainly craft functionable tableware I prefer creating an entire collection that work together and last a lifetime. We want our customers to keep these pieces forever so while staying away from anything to niche or trendy is important, we also leave room for freedom of fun and playfulness.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece? 

There's a beautiful connection with taking earth materials and using the elements of water and fire to create art that will live beyond your own life span is one of the most special parts of working with clay. Since I am a nature lover it fits me well and feels good to create from the earth and for these pieces to perhaps one day go back into the earth.

What does ART, in general, mean to you? 

Art is a creation that first starts in your mind and vision, and with materials you're translating thoughts into actual forms. Art is a feeling of joy or sadness that you can express outside the body.
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Elizabeth Di Prinzio for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.
In our search for inspiration we are often intrigued by unusual designs, strange shapes, exciting colors... We search for a seed which will be planted into our imagination and grow up to be a whole new project. This time our search had a small twist!
Travis Sudweeks creates pottery for the last thirty years. During that period he developed an astonishing level of perfection while creating his pieces. His smooth, minimalistic designs carry a dose of luxury that came from a years invested in his craft.
His style is definition of what he loves to see and the things he would love to use. And trough the years it has been a proven good practice.
A lesson we all should follow. A seed of wisdom to be nurtured.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

I’m currently based in Salt Lake City, Utah. It’s gorgeous in nature here. 

The journey began 30 years ago as a 14 year old freshman at Timpview High School in Provo, Utah. I was taught by master potter Andrew Watson. I knew I loved it from the beginning, and took every class I could. I would stay after school for hours making terrible pots, but always learning and not caring how good things were. It was fun. It still is fun. I learned from Andrew  for many years after high school, and I still do learn from him. We chat on the phone and I learn from his goodness at being a human who works with clay. At one point, I lived in his huge farm house studio, it was anything but glamorous and was filled to bursting with not only pottery, but old cars, musical instruments, farm equipment, horse gear, couches, and a thousand other items that could have been seen as gross or interesting, depending on the person. 

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Excitement I believe is my first emotion when I figure out a new design I want to make, or a glaze technique that works out. Usually I can’t wait to make more of the idea. When I first started on my path to becoming a full time potter I would dream of pieces, and I just had to go and make them. I would see them all the time in odd places, at odd moments, until I made them and then the drive would go away. I’ve also found inspiration when I swim laps, sometimes a shape will just pop in my mind when I swim. Very odd. It doesn’t happen as much to me anymore, it makes me kind of sad that it doesn’t. Maybe i make to much pottery now. But either way, it’s still a lot of fun and very gratifying to make useful pieces that people will use and hopefully love for a long time. 

 

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

My design aesthetic took a very long time to figure out, it still meanders, I feel like there are more roads to travel down with my design until I really feel like my glazes are 100 percent me. But I feel like my designs are me. I used to travel a lot, from those travels I was changed by the beauty of old and new architecture, and I found I absolutely love gaudy European architecture, the skill and art work, time and patience, and love that went in to those buildings, oh the stories they could tell. I love how these traditions continue on with the artisans of today restoring the old and keeping them alive. It truly blows my mind. But with pottery, I’ve found that I love simplicity, and I find that my favorite pieces to use, to touch, and to look at are the simple ones. Luckily, I find that many people and customers resonate with what I like to make, which allows me to keep creating and expanding my ideas and supporting my small family with pottery. 

 

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

This could be a book. I’m sure someone has written it. But I will try to tell you how much heart ache and pain and love goes in to all my pieces. Insecurities of making and design pop up every day. For instance, why don’t I sell out on my Virtual Studio Sales? How can I make more pottery? How can my designs be better so enough people will buy them to make this all easier? When can I finally buy a damn Ferrari? Just kidding, I only want a Vespa. Money can be an issue, summer is my slow time and I’m trying to figure out how to get over this hurdle. Having enough capital on hand to purchase materials, tools, etc, is crucial and is so important. When I first started on this full time venture I had to figure out how I could throw enough pottery to get as good as I could, as fast as I could all while working a full time job. Now I don’t have enough time in the day to make enough pottery. It’s always something. Right? As of January I now take Sunday’s off. This is the first time in 5 years that I’ve taken a day of the week off. But I wouldn’t have it any other way, well I would have it a little easier to make money, a little more time off, that imaginary house in the Swiss Alps is calling my name, just kidding, it’s in Portugal. 

 

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I like both. Single pieces can stand out and really tell a story, for me this is especially true with large vases. These pieces show so much craftsmanship, and can really be a statement to who the artisan is. But I also have fallen in love with the look of a hundred mugs waiting to be trimmed, all pretty much identical. There is beauty in repetition. 

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use clay, I love clay, it connects me with the earth, it connects me with the people that use or own my pottery, it connects me to the other potters in the world that love to make pottery as well. Clay is every changing, it is an impossible process that we humans, ever the smug ones, think we can master, but we can never master clay, not even the masters.  

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art makes you feel. It is an experience. Art has the power to take you away from your problems and sweep into a world of it’s own making. For that brief moment we become part of that art.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Travis Sudweeks for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

In our search for inspiration we are often intrigued by unusual designs, strange shapes, exciting colors... We search for a seed which will be planted into our imagination and grow up to be a whole new project. This time our search had a small twist!
Travis Sudweeks creates pottery for the last thirty years. During that period he developed an astonishing level of perfection while creating his pieces. His smooth, minimalistic designs carry a dose of luxury that came from a years invested in his craft.
His style is definition of what he loves to see and the things he would love to use. And trough the years it has been a proven good practice.
A lesson we all should follow. A seed of wisdom to be nurtured.

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

I’m currently based in Salt Lake City, Utah. It’s gorgeous in nature here. 

The journey began 30 years ago as a 14 year old freshman at Timpview High School in Provo, Utah. I was taught by master potter Andrew Watson. I knew I loved it from the beginning, and took every class I could. I would stay after school for hours making terrible pots, but always learning and not caring how good things were. It was fun. It still is fun. I learned from Andrew  for many years after high school, and I still do learn from him. We chat on the phone and I learn from his goodness at being a human who works with clay. At one point, I lived in his huge farm house studio, it was anything but glamorous and was filled to bursting with not only pottery, but old cars, musical instruments, farm equipment, horse gear, couches, and a thousand other items that could have been seen as gross or interesting, depending on the person. 

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

Excitement I believe is my first emotion when I figure out a new design I want to make, or a glaze technique that works out. Usually I can’t wait to make more of the idea. When I first started on my path to becoming a full time potter I would dream of pieces, and I just had to go and make them. I would see them all the time in odd places, at odd moments, until I made them and then the drive would go away. I’ve also found inspiration when I swim laps, sometimes a shape will just pop in my mind when I swim. Very odd. It doesn’t happen as much to me anymore, it makes me kind of sad that it doesn’t. Maybe i make to much pottery now. But either way, it’s still a lot of fun and very gratifying to make useful pieces that people will use and hopefully love for a long time. 

 

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

My design aesthetic took a very long time to figure out, it still meanders, I feel like there are more roads to travel down with my design until I really feel like my glazes are 100 percent me. But I feel like my designs are me. I used to travel a lot, from those travels I was changed by the beauty of old and new architecture, and I found I absolutely love gaudy European architecture, the skill and art work, time and patience, and love that went in to those buildings, oh the stories they could tell. I love how these traditions continue on with the artisans of today restoring the old and keeping them alive. It truly blows my mind. But with pottery, I’ve found that I love simplicity, and I find that my favorite pieces to use, to touch, and to look at are the simple ones. Luckily, I find that many people and customers resonate with what I like to make, which allows me to keep creating and expanding my ideas and supporting my small family with pottery. 

 

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

This could be a book. I’m sure someone has written it. But I will try to tell you how much heart ache and pain and love goes in to all my pieces. Insecurities of making and design pop up every day. For instance, why don’t I sell out on my Virtual Studio Sales? How can I make more pottery? How can my designs be better so enough people will buy them to make this all easier? When can I finally buy a damn Ferrari? Just kidding, I only want a Vespa. Money can be an issue, summer is my slow time and I’m trying to figure out how to get over this hurdle. Having enough capital on hand to purchase materials, tools, etc, is crucial and is so important. When I first started on this full time venture I had to figure out how I could throw enough pottery to get as good as I could, as fast as I could all while working a full time job. Now I don’t have enough time in the day to make enough pottery. It’s always something. Right? As of January I now take Sunday’s off. This is the first time in 5 years that I’ve taken a day of the week off. But I wouldn’t have it any other way, well I would have it a little easier to make money, a little more time off, that imaginary house in the Swiss Alps is calling my name, just kidding, it’s in Portugal. 

 

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I like both. Single pieces can stand out and really tell a story, for me this is especially true with large vases. These pieces show so much craftsmanship, and can really be a statement to who the artisan is. But I also have fallen in love with the look of a hundred mugs waiting to be trimmed, all pretty much identical. There is beauty in repetition. 

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I use clay, I love clay, it connects me with the earth, it connects me with the people that use or own my pottery, it connects me to the other potters in the world that love to make pottery as well. Clay is every changing, it is an impossible process that we humans, ever the smug ones, think we can master, but we can never master clay, not even the masters.  

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art makes you feel. It is an experience. Art has the power to take you away from your problems and sweep into a world of it’s own making. For that brief moment we become part of that art.

The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Travis Sudweeks for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Our blog is the place where we talk about art. About emotions and energy which create the world around us. It is a place where we learn and get new information. Today we have a great pleasure to present to you one very inspiring lady. The lady who asks the questions looks for an answer and contributes to the positive change in the best way she can. Meghan Yarnell created a pottery brand for which she finds inspiration in one of the most severe problems of her community. Her art pieces educate you most profoundly. With her subtle approach, she leaves a deep mark and makes you think more. What are our priorities in life, where are we heading to?

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

I am from Toledo, Ohio. Some of my best childhood memories are from the many hours that I spent exploring the woods, field, and pond behind the house I grew up in. These hours were magical and helped begin and fuel my fascination with the natural world. I was very lucky to grow up in a family that valued the arts and always supported my desire to create. 

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I read constantly. Usually, I read something that triggers an idea. I live in a suburb and well manicured, green lawns are the standard. I read that grass is the largest cultivated crop in the United States (and it is essentially worthless). Clovers are nitrogen fixers, they naturally add nitrogen to the soil. Dandelions have long taproots that bring nutrients up to the surface of the soil. Both of these flowers provide food for bees, yet are undesirable in lawns. Herbicides destroy clovers and dandelions and add synthetic nitrogen to the soil, which can run into rivers and lakes. I live near Lake Erie. A few years ago, we had a toxic algae bloom (synthetic fertilizers contribute to this) and we could not drink, or even touch our faucet water for 3 days (and after that it was being treated with so many chemicals that many didn't want to drink it). I began decorating some of my pots with clovers and dandelions in response to this. There are blades of grass mixed in with the flowers, but they are purposefully pale outlines. 
When I first have an idea for a new design, I usually start by gathering information and taking notes in my sketchbook. I search for images and inspiration online, then do some preliminary sketches before testing the design on one of my pots. All of my designs are constantly changing and evolving as I am never content and am constantly reevaluating and changing things! 

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I hope to subtly convey the contrast and collision between humans and the natural world by combining images of nature with patterns created with modern symbols like the dollar sign, nuclear symbol, and wifi symbol. I create functional pottery because I love the idea that art can be both beautiful and useful. I like to think that my work is subtlety infused with enough meaning to inspire thought while it is being used.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

I have been teaching art in a public school for the past 16 years, so pottery is not my main source of income. I mainly create pottery because I enjoy it and I find a lot of my identity in being an artist. My advice for starting artists is to define your goals and work towards them. There are so many paths to pursue with art and it's easy to become distracted or overwhelmed. 

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer single pieces. My pottery is functional and designed for everyday use. I would be honored if one of my cups was someone's go-to everyday coffee mug.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I love the idea of functional art, something that was created with care by a person and also designed to be used with care by a person. I fell in love with porcelain the minute I saw it being used in college and have used it ever since. My first loves were painting and drawing, so my work contains as many surface design techniques that I can fit on it! 

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is a process, a way of life, and a way of seeing the world. 
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Meghan Yarnell for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.

Our blog is the place where we talk about art. About emotions and energy which create the world around us. It is a place where we learn and get new information. Today we have a great pleasure to present to you one very inspiring lady. The lady who asks the questions looks for an answer and contributes to the positive change in the best way she can. Meghan Yarnell created a pottery brand for which she finds inspiration in one of the most severe problems of her community. Her art pieces educate you most profoundly. With her subtle approach, she leaves a deep mark and makes you think more. What are our priorities in life, where are we heading to?

Where are you from? Where does the art journey start for you? 

I am from Toledo, Ohio. Some of my best childhood memories are from the many hours that I spent exploring the woods, field, and pond behind the house I grew up in. These hours were magical and helped begin and fuel my fascination with the natural world. I was very lucky to grow up in a family that valued the arts and always supported my desire to create. 

What is the first emotion that drives you towards creating an art piece? Do you recognize the connection immediately and let yourself flow on the creative process? Or do you "bake" the inspiration for some time?

I read constantly. Usually, I read something that triggers an idea. I live in a suburb and well manicured, green lawns are the standard. I read that grass is the largest cultivated crop in the United States (and it is essentially worthless). Clovers are nitrogen fixers, they naturally add nitrogen to the soil. Dandelions have long taproots that bring nutrients up to the surface of the soil. Both of these flowers provide food for bees, yet are undesirable in lawns. Herbicides destroy clovers and dandelions and add synthetic nitrogen to the soil, which can run into rivers and lakes. I live near Lake Erie. A few years ago, we had a toxic algae bloom (synthetic fertilizers contribute to this) and we could not drink, or even touch our faucet water for 3 days (and after that it was being treated with so many chemicals that many didn't want to drink it). I began decorating some of my pots with clovers and dandelions in response to this. There are blades of grass mixed in with the flowers, but they are purposefully pale outlines. 
When I first have an idea for a new design, I usually start by gathering information and taking notes in my sketchbook. I search for images and inspiration online, then do some preliminary sketches before testing the design on one of my pots. All of my designs are constantly changing and evolving as I am never content and am constantly reevaluating and changing things! 

What is the back story of your design? Because every one of us sees the world through separate lenses. How hard it must be to transfer it to other people?

I hope to subtly convey the contrast and collision between humans and the natural world by combining images of nature with patterns created with modern symbols like the dollar sign, nuclear symbol, and wifi symbol. I create functional pottery because I love the idea that art can be both beautiful and useful. I like to think that my work is subtlety infused with enough meaning to inspire thought while it is being used.

When it comes to making a living from your art, what are the main struggles? And what would be your advice for starting artists?

I have been teaching art in a public school for the past 16 years, so pottery is not my main source of income. I mainly create pottery because I enjoy it and I find a lot of my identity in being an artist. My advice for starting artists is to define your goals and work towards them. There are so many paths to pursue with art and it's easy to become distracted or overwhelmed. 

What do you prefer, single pieces or storytelling through a whole project? And what approach do you use in each case?

I prefer single pieces. My pottery is functional and designed for everyday use. I would be honored if one of my cups was someone's go-to everyday coffee mug.

Why do you use certain materials? What connects you with them, and makes you feel they are perfect for your art piece?

I love the idea of functional art, something that was created with care by a person and also designed to be used with care by a person. I fell in love with porcelain the minute I saw it being used in college and have used it ever since. My first loves were painting and drawing, so my work contains as many surface design techniques that I can fit on it! 

What does ART, in general, mean to you?

Art is a process, a way of life, and a way of seeing the world. 
The FOURLINEdesign team would like to thank Meghan Yarnell for sharing inspiring thoughts with our community.